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Take Action to Limit Electricity Rate Hikes

Posted by Bob Rio on Jul 22, 2016 11:57:57 AM

Employers concerned about the rising cost of electricity in Massachusetts take note – it’s time to contact members of a legislative conference committee hammering out an energy bill that could make your current electric bill look like child’s play.

Electriclinessmall.jpg The message: Pass a bill that follows the detailed recommendations of a four-page letter sent by AIM earlier this week.

The Legislature and Governor Charlie Baker have made it a priority to secure passage of an energy/electricity bill prior to the end of the session on July 31. 

AIM supports the commonwealth’s efforts to transition its economy to non-carbon fuel sources and attract new businesses to Massachusetts.  At the same time, the complex House and Senate energy bills now in conference will have far-reaching and irreversible impacts upon employers and citizens alike during the next two decades. 

One fact is clear: The final bill will raise electric rates.  Under virtually any scenario the above-market costs passed to ratepayers in the form of rate hikes could be larger than any utility rate hike in history. Massachusetts could end up buying up to 40 percent of its electricity from high-priced renewable energy sources.

The disparity between electric rates in Massachusetts and those in competing states is hindering the ability of employers to attract and retain jobs. The list of internationally known companies that have moved out of Massachusetts just in the last year is long and includes Polartec in Lawrence; SABIC in Pittsfield; Kraft Foods in Woburn; General Mills in Methuen; General Foods in Woburn; and Notini and Sons in Lowell.

Traditional companies located in Gateway cities are at particular risk. These companies are not beneficiaries of the new economy, but still provide good paying jobs, tax revenue and spin-off spending to their communities. 

Other Massachusetts employer groups also sent a letter to the conference committee this week urging lawmakers to factor in costs to ratepayers.

Contact the Energy Conference Committee

 

Topics: Electricity, Energy

Senate Concurs with Compromise Wage-Equity Bill

Posted by Brad MacDougall on Jul 21, 2016 3:20:57 PM

The Massachusetts Legislature unanimously passed on Saturday a compromise pay-equity bill hammered out among House leaders, the attorney general and the business community. The measure now goes to Governor Charlie Baker.

StateHouse-resized-600.png“The business community is gratified that legislative leaders are moving forward with a bill that ensures fair compensation for all workers while allowing employers to attract and retain skilled employees,” said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIM.

“House Speaker Robert DeLeo and his leadership team deserve tremendous credit for reaching out directly to AIM and really listening to the concerns of employers.”

The legislation is intended to promote salary transparency, limit upfront questions to job candidates about salary history, and encourage companies to conduct reviews to detect pay disparities. It explicitly recognizes legitimate market forces such as performance and the competitive landscape for certain skills that cause pay differences among employees. 

That recognition will allow employers to continue to reward star performers and to compete in the white-hot market for workers with skills such as computer programming, engineering, advanced manufacturing and biosciences.

The bill states that “no employer shall discriminate in any way on the basis of gender in the payment of wages, or pay any person in its employ a salary or wage rate less than the rates paid to its employees of a different gender for comparable work.” Wage differentials are permitted, however, based upon:

  • a system that rewards seniority with the employer
  • a merit system
  • a system that measures earnings by quantity or quality of production, sales, or revenue
  • the geographic location in which a job is performed
  • education, training or experience to the extent such factors are reasonably related to the particular job in question; or
  • travel, if the travel is a regular and necessary condition of the particular job.

There were several additional provisions that persuaded AIM and its 4,000 member employers to support the House bill:

  • It provides a three-year affirmative defense from liability to employers who conduct a self-evaluation of their pay practices in good faith and can demonstrate that reasonable progress has been made towards eliminating wage differentials based on gender for comparable work. The self-evaluation may be of the employer’s own design, so long as it is reasonable in detail and scope in light of the size of the employer, or may be consistent with standard templates or forms issued by the attorney general.
  • Affirms the ability of employers to protect the confidential information about employee wages should another employee seek that information.

John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs for AIM, credited DeLeo, Speaker Pro Temp Patricia Haddad of Somerset, House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Brian Dempsey of Haverhill and Attorney General Healey for developing a workable compromise on pay equity.

The law would take effect on July 1, 2018.

 

Topics: Employment Law, Pay Equity

AIM to Honor International Business Leaders at Symposium

Posted by Kristen Rupert on Jul 20, 2016 2:33:47 PM

Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) announced today that it will present its 21st annual Global Trade Awards at a new Global Trade Symposium Oct. 6 at Gillette Stadium.

Globe.jpgThe 2016 AIM Global Trade Breakfast Symposium will honor up to four Massachusetts companies, organizations or individuals for distinguished achievement in international business. The event will also bring together experts from throughout the commonwealth to discuss current issues affecting international trade.

AIM’s International Business Council has honored more than 80 companies since initiating the Global Trade Awards in 1996.

“AIM is creating a signature event that will underscore the vital role that international trade plays in the health of the Massachusetts economy,” said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIM.

“Massachusetts is a global economic, educational and research center and AIM is delighted to honor the achievements of the people and companies that have made it that way.”

AIM is currently accepting nominations for the 2016 Global Trade Awards. Nominated companies must demonstrate that they have:

  • increased or retained jobs in Massachusetts by entering new global markets;
  • demonstrated new or creative solutions for import/export challenges;
  • produced or adapted a product line or service for foreign markets;
  • established alliances or partnerships to increase international trade; or
  • invested in infrastructure or manufacturing in Mass. to enhance trade.

Applications are reviewed and winners selected by a subcommittee of AIM’s International Business Council board.  The deadline for nominations is August 20.

Apply for a Global Trade Award

The 2015 Global Trade Awards went to water-treatment innovator Desalitech, advanced materials leader Hollingsworth & Vose Company, and Massport. Other winners throughout the years have ranged from V.H. Blackinton to Ocean Spray to Pittsfield-based Interprint.

More than 200 Massachusetts business leaders are expected to attend the October 6 Symposium, which will feature a breakfast, keynote speaker, panel discussion, and awards ceremony in the Putnam Club at Gillette Stadium. Executives from across the commonwealth will share insights on how they’ve grown their businesses internationally, what’s made Massachusetts a unique player on the global stage, and what global trade might look like in the future.      

“AIM believes that Massachusetts deserves a world-class gathering to celebrate its status as an international trade leader.” said Kristen Rupert, Executive Director of the AIM International Business Council.

“We look forward to honoring Massachusetts companies that play key roles in the global economy, offering innovative products and services produced in Massachusetts to markets across the globe.”

Topics: International Trade, AIM International Business Council

Senate Takes Step Back on Non-Competes

Posted by Brad MacDougall on Jul 15, 2016 11:33:12 AM

The Massachusetts Senate took a dramatic step backward yesterday on non-compete agreements, passing Draconian restrictions that would effectively end of the use of the documents in the Bay State.

ScalesofJusticeVerySmall.jpgThe Senate passed by voice vote a measure that would limit non-compete agreements to three months and require employers to pay the full salary of the former employee during the restricted period. The bill would exempt anyone earning $130,000 or less from non-competes.

The Senate measure stands in marked contrast to a compromise version passed by the House in late June that allows one-year non-competes and not require companies that compensate employees at the time they sign non-competes to pay them again during the restricted period.

Lawmakers will have to reconcile all those differences before the session ends on July 31 if a non-compete bill is to become law. 

“Employers support the House bill, period,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

“House leaders worked with people on all sides of the issue and came up with a reasonable compromise that protects the rights of both employers and workers. The idea that you would now compromise a compromise makes no sense.”

Employers believe selective use of non-competes protects the significant investments that allow their companies to be global leaders in their industries and to create jobs in the commonwealth.  The compromise legislation begins to recognize that Massachusetts employers need flexibility and legal options to protect intellectual property. 

AIM continues to maintain that there is no evidence that the use of non-compete agreements harms Massachusetts’ position as a globally recognized leader in innovation. In fact, Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filings indicate that the well-heeled venture capitalists pushing to limit non-competes use such agreements themselves.

Employers have articulated several provisions that would be required for them to support a bill limiting non-competes:

  • Minimum one-year duration.
  • A “garden leave” provision that requires the employer to pay 50% of the employees’ prorated salary during the restricted period, or other mutually-agreed upon compensation.
  • Maintaining and clarifying the ability of a court to reform or alter non-compete contracts to ensure that both parties are treated fairly.
  • Those subject to non-compete agreements would have to be given prior notice of the need to sign the agreement, as well as the opportunity to consult with legal counsel.
  • The non-compete would extend to a second year should an employee unlawfully take property belonging to the employer, as included in the House version.

 

Topics: Employment Law, Non-Compete Agreements

AIM Backs Compromise Wage-Equity Bill

Posted by Brad MacDougall on Jul 13, 2016 1:38:28 PM

Associated Industries of Massachusetts announced that it supports compromise pay-equity legislation passed by the House of Representatives on Thursday.

Fourpeople.jpgThe bill recommended late yesterday by the House Ways and Means Committee follows weeks of intensive negotiations among AIM, House leaders at Attorney General Maura Healey. AIM unequivocally supports pay equity, but opposed previous versions of the measure that would have limited the ability of employers to attract and retain skilled employees.

“The compromise ensures that workers will be fairly compensated without regard to gender but instead according to the value they bring to the business enterprise,” said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIM.

“The Board of Directors of AIM very much wanted to support a pay-equity initiative, so we rolled up our sleeves and worked collaboratively with the House and the Attorney General to develop to ensure that the bill worked both for employees and employers.”

The legislation is intended to promote salary transparency, limit upfront questions to job candidates about salary history, and encourage companies to conduct reviews to detect pay disparities. Unlike the overly proscriptive bill passed by the Senate in April, the House version explicitly recognizes legitimate market forces such as performance and the competitive landscape for certain skills that cause pay differences among employees. 

That recognition will allow employers to continue to reward star performers and to compete in the white-hot market for workers with skills such as computer programming, engineering, advanced manufacturing and biosciences.

The bill states that “no employer shall discriminate in any way on the basis of gender in the payment of wages, or pay any person in its employ a salary or wage rate less than the rates paid to its employees of a different gender for comparable work.” Wage differentials are permitted, however, based upon:

  • a system that rewards seniority with the employer
  • a merit system
  • a system that measures earnings by quantity or quality of production, sales, or revenue
  • the geographic location in which a job is performed
  • education, training or experience to the extent such factors are reasonably related to the particular job in question; or
  • travel, if the travel is a regular and necessary condition of the particular job.

There were several additional provisions that persuaded AIM and its 4,500 member employers to support the House bill:

  • It provides a three-year affirmative defense from liability to employers who conduct a self-evaluation of their pay practices in good faith and can demonstrate that reasonable progress has been made towards eliminating wage differentials based on gender for comparable work. The self-evaluation may be of the employer’s own design, so long as it is reasonable in detail and scope in light of the size of the employer, or may be consistent with standard templates or forms issued by the attorney general.
  • It eliminates an outright ban on salary-history questions contained in the Senate version and replaces it with language that allows an employee to voluntary disclose salary information and then allows an employer to ask the employee to confirm prior wages after an offer has been made.
  • Affirms the ability of employers to protect the confidential information about employee wages should another employee seek that information.

“The bill is not perfect, but that is the nature of compromise and negotiation,” Lord said. “But the bottom line is that employers committed to hiring the best people regardless of gender may continue to design their compensation programs based upon market conditions.

AIM and its member employers are committed to providing fair compensation to employees according to the value and success they bring to our enterprises. In an economy where skilled workers remain at a premium, any company that does not value all of its employees equally is unlikely to be around very long.

John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs for AIM, credited House Speaker Robert DeLeo, Speaker Pro Temp Patricia Haddad of Somerset, House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Brian Dempsey of Haverhill and Attorney General Healey for listening to the concerns of employers.

“We continue to believe that the best long-term strategy to achieve pay equity in the workplace is to ensure that both women and men possess the education and skills that allow our enterprises to succeed an in increasingly complex global economy,” Regan said.

The law would take effect on July 1, 2018.

Topics: Employment Law, wage equity

Transgender Law Will Have Modest Effect on Business

Posted by Tom Jones on Jul 11, 2016 3:38:03 PM

The transgender-rights bill signed last Friday by Governor Charlie Baker may be a landmark piece of social legislation, but it is expected to have a modest effect on Massachusetts employers who have operated since 2012 under a law barring discrimination based upon gender identity.

statehousedome.jpgMassachusetts joins a growing list of states across the country in adopting some form of legal protections for transgender people. More than 100 advocates joined Attorney General Maura Healey, Boston Mayor J. Walsh, Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, and House Speaker Robert DeLeo on the State House steps this morning to mark passage of the legislation.

The issue for many employers was addressed four years ago with the adoption of the gender identity amendment to the Massachusetts anti-discrimination law. The law states that if an employee faces discrimination due to gender identity, or is not accommodated in transition, the employee may have a legal claim against the employer.

The principal focus of new law is access for transgender people to places of public accommodation -meaning places that offer products or services to members of the public. Massachusetts courts have generally defined “public accommodation” broadly so businesses that invite the public in will be covered under the law.

Examples of public accommodation include stores, restaurants, malls and theaters. A company that invites the public for tours or free samples may also be covered. So if transgender sales representative were to visit a facility and was turned away due to gender identity or denied access to use the restroom, the action could violate the law.

Employers need to review current policies and practices to ensure compliance. That may involve informing and training supervisors and other managers about the existence of the law, its impact in the workplace and where they can go with questions.

Parts of the law take effect immediately, other sections take effect this autumn.

As of September 1, the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and the Attorney General’s office will adopt regulations in support of the implementation of the law, including when and how gender identity, may be shown.

Topics: Employment Law, Discrimination

Panama Canal Expansion Will Benefit Port of Boston

Posted by Kristen Rupert on Jul 7, 2016 3:10:36 PM

Editor's note - Kristen Rupert is Executive Director of the AIM International Business Council.

I recently traveled to Panama for ceremonies marketing the expansion of the Panama Canal, a project with significant implications for the Port of Boston and the Massachusetts economy.

Rupert.jpgDriving the Canal expansion is the advent of newer “Post-Panamax” or “Neo-Panamax” container ships, which can carry up to 15,000 containers or “TEU’s,” (twenty-foot equivalent units.)  The historic Panama Canal can accommodate only 5000 TEU ships; expansion enables the Canal to accept much larger vessels.  These ships previously had to transit through the Suez Canal or around the Horn of Africa. 

Ports across the Eastern United States will be most affected by the Panama Canal expansion, because Neo-Panamax ships from Asia—China, mostly—will now have the option of transiting the Canal and heading to ports such as Norfolk, Baltimore, Miami, Savannah and Charleston, and eventually New York, rather than docking in California at Long Beach and moving cargo across the U.S. via train or truck.  Significant cost savings can be achieved by carriers using larger ships that can carry cargo closer to its ultimate U.S. destination.  U.S. shipments of LNG to Asia are also expected to use the new Canal.

The Port of Boston is already benefitting from the expanded Canal.  COSCO—China Ocean Shipping Company—is a longtime partner of the Port of Boston; the company recently committed to doubling the capacity of their ships calling on Boston from China.  This will enable Massport’s Conley Terminal—the only full-service container terminal in New England—to handle significantly more volume.  This translates into jobs and positive economic impact.

The U.S. Government has committed to funding a major dredging project for Boston Harbor, though the appropriation has not yet been finalized.  In the meantime, some inner harbor dredging is taking place along with dock improvements.  (Among the imports and exports moving through Conley Terminal are seafood, footwear, waste paper, scrap metal, furniture, beer and wine, and apparel.)

In late June, Panama inaugurated the expansion of the 100-year-old Canal with a day-long celebration featuring speeches, fireworks and a huge (1,000 feet long and 160 feet wide) Chinese container ship transiting through the new locks from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans.  Panamanians are justifiably proud of their fifty-mile long Canal, which returns more than $2 Billion per year to the Panamanian government.  Thousands of Panamanians turned out along the Canal for the expansion inauguration, waving flags and celebrating an historic day.

The expansion was at least 10 years in the making and cost more than $5 billion.  Tens of thousands of workers have labored since 2007 to design, blast, dredge and build extensive new locks and approaches on both the Pacific and the Atlantic sides of the Panamanian isthmus.  Although the new locks are much bigger than the historic locks, they use less water; 60 percent of the water that fills the locks as ships pass through is being re-used through large water saving basins.

The new locks feature rolling gates, similar to sliding doors you might see on a barn.  The old locks, still in use in a different part of the Canal, use saloon-door type gates which swing open and closed.  The tallest of the new lock gates is about 100 feet high. 

The Panama Canal expansion project struggled through numerous challenges, including low water in Lake Gatun which feeds the locks, issues with the quality of the concrete used for the locks, the decision to use tugboats rather than “mules” or mini-train engines to guide ships through the locks, cost over-runs, and the smaller-than-desired space in each lock (many pilots said they wish the new locks—at 1,400 feet long and 180 feet wide--were longer and wider.)

In addition, the future for global shipping is a bit cloudy.  Fuel prices have dropped dramatically, China is going through an economic slowdown, and global trade is in a lull.  Despite this, the expanded Panama Canal has more than 150 crossings scheduled for the next several months.  Only time will tell how Panama benefits from its new, expanded Canal.

Topics: International Trade

AIM Announces Human Resource Alliances

Posted by Lori Bourgoin on Jul 6, 2016 7:30:00 AM

Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) announced today that it has entered into alliances with two prominent human-resources organizations to expand learning and professional development opportunities for HR professionals throughout the region.

NEHRA.jpgAIM and the Northeast Human Resources Association (NEHRA) have forged an agreement that will provide AIM members with discounted access to NEHRA’s job board, core programs and conferences. NEHRA members will in turn qualify for special pricing on AIM HR Roundtables and Just-in-Time Webinars.

Separately, AIM and the HR Certification Institute (HCRI) have agreed to an initiative that will provide HR professionals who work for AIM-member companies credit toward renewing important professional credentials such as the PHR (Professional in Human Resources) and SPHR (Senior Professional in Human Resources). Member HR professionals will also get a discount on HCRI certification exams.

“AIM is delighted to embark upon two collaborations that will provide HR professionals with a convenient pathway to learning and professional recognition,” said Gary McDonald, Executive Vice President of the AIM Employers Resource Group.

“We have tremendous respect for both NEHRA and HCRI and look forward to making their programs and services accessible to AIM members.

The benefits of the NEHRA agreement for AIM members include:

  • Special pricing for the NEHRA job board (NEHRA Members $250, AIM Members $300, NON-Members $350)
  • Fifteen percent discount on NEHRA Core Programs
  • Special pricing on NEHRA’s September conference in Falmouth:

Founded 30 years ago, NEHRA counts more than 2,000 individual members. The organization’s goal is to help HR professionals “connect, grow and thrive” by providing relevant and timely educational programs, access to tools and resources, and myriad opportunities to network with peers.  

“We believe that this partnership will extend the ability of our members to grow professionally and connect with colleagues in their ‘neighborhood’ on a regular basis.  It will expand their access to timely and relevant information that will help then be successful in their jobs and careers – adding value to their organizations,” said Carol Edson, Director of Membership and Partnership at NEHRA.

HRCI.jpgThe alliance with HRCI is a major win for AIM and its members.  HRCI-certified staff and AIM members now enjoy the following benefits:

  • Up to 12 credit hours toward the 60 credit hours required to gain HRCI recertification;
  • $50 discount off any HRCI certification exam;
  • The opportunity to attend HRCI events and access HRCI services.

HR Certification Institute, headquartered in the U.S., is the premier credentialing organization for the human resources profession. Over the last 40 years, HRCI has certified more than 500,000 HR professionals in 100 countries.

AIM is the largest employer association in Massachusetts, representing the interests of more than 4,000 company members. AIM’s mission is to promote the well-being of its members and their employees and the prosperity of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by improving the economic climate of Massachusetts, advocating fair and equitable public policy, and providing relevant, reliable information and excellent services. 

AIM members seeking more information may contact Katelyn Buckley, cbuckley@aimnet.org, or contact:

HRCI
Nella Deaza, Partnership Account Manager
Nella.Deaza@hrci.org
1725 Duke Street, Suite 700
Alexandria, Virginia USA 22314
Direct: 571-551-6725

NEHRA
Carole Edson,Director of Membership and Alliances
One Concord Farm
490 Virginia Road, Ste. 32 
Concord, MA 01742
Phone:781-239-8705
cedson@nehra.com

 

Uncertainty Weakens Business Confidence

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jul 5, 2016 7:30:00 AM

A month of economic uncertainty punctuated by weak US job growth and the United Kingdom’s impending exit from the European Union drove Massachusetts employer confidence lower during June.

BCI.June.2016.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) fell 1.6 points to 56.1 as employers took an increasingly bearish view of the US economy. At the same time, the confidence reading remained comfortably above the 50 mark that denotes an overall positive economic outlook. Taken quarterly, confidence rose from 55.8 during the first three months of the year to 56.7 during April, May and June.

The June survey of employers overlapped by a few days the landmark vote in Great Britain the leave the European Union, an outcome that caused financial gyrations and concern about US exports in the face of a rising dollar. The confidence readings also came in the wake of the slowest pace of job creation in the US since 2010.

“Massachusetts employers are trying to balance a range of economic and political distractions that pull them in different directions month to month,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“The good news is that employers remain highly confident in the Massachusetts economy and in the prospects for their own companies.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators Fall

All the sub-indices based on selected questions or categories of employer declined slightly during June after rising to a 10-month high in May.

The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, dropped a modest 0.8 points to 58.5, up 1.6 points from the year earlier. The U.S. Index of national business conditions plunged three points to 48.8. Employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than about the national economy for 74 consecutive months.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, lost 1.9 points to 55.5 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, declined 1.5 points to 56.6.

“Despite concerns about the potential effect of a strong dollar on exports, employers continue to believe that Massachusetts has the type of economy that will ride out all the global uncertainty,” said Barry Bluestone, Stearns Trustee Professor of Political Economy Northeastern University.

“As long as the key industries of the Massachusetts economy - health care, higher education, financial services, bioscience and tourism - continue to grow as a share of national and world GDP, the economy of the Commonwealth will be reasonably sound for the majority of households in the state. The challenge is how to spread this prosperity to more households.”

The three sub-indices bearing on survey respondents’ own operations all weakened.

The Company Index, reflecting overall business conditions, fell 1.5 points to 57.7, while the Sales Index dropped 2.8 points to 57.0 and the Employment Index lost 0.6 points to 54.5.

“Uncertainty of the sort created by the Brexit vote certainly impedes investment decisions, and with few signs of any pickup in the global economy we're probably going to see a slower rebound in capital spending," said Sara Johnson, senior research director of global economics with IHS Global Insight.

The AIM survey found that nearly 39 percent of respondents reported adding staff during the past six months while 19 percent reduced employment. Expectations for the next six months were stable – 37 percent hiring and only 10 percent downsizing.

Confidence levels in June were higher in Greater Boston (58.9) than in the rest of the commonwealth (55.6). Non-manufacturing companies enjoyed a significantly brighter outlook at 59.5 than manufacturing employers, who posted an overall confidence level of 54.38

Politics and Economics

AIM’s President and CEO Richard C. Lord, a BEA member, said the Brexit vote underscores the profound effect that political discourse has on the global economic outlook. It’s a pertinent lesson for Massachusetts as the Baker Administration and Beacon Hill lawmakers wrestle with both a billion-dollar budget deficit and critical debates on energy, wage equity and the use of non-compete agreements.

“The sustained optimism that Massachusetts employers have shown toward the state economy reflects the ability of the Legislature and several administrations to maintain disciplined fiscal policy while creating an environment that allows employers to grow,” Lord said.

“We look forward to working with policymakers to continue that record as the two-year legislative session ends next month.”

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy

Manufacturing Month Shows the Future of Industry

Posted by Brian Gilmore on Jun 29, 2016 2:13:14 PM

What's the best way to remind Massachusetts residents that manufacturing is alive and well in the Bay State?

The answer is for manufacturing companies to take part in National Manufacturing Day on October 7 and Massachusetts Manufacturing Month during the entire month of October.

Go to mfgday.com to register an event for free publicity and helpful ideas for hosting an event. And check out MassDevelopment’s AMP it UP! to view videos of manufacturing events. Then contact me for more information and ideas - bgilmore@aimnet.org or 617-262-1180 Ext. 322. 

Why is manufacturing important? Check out these numbers:

ManufacturingMonth2016.1.jpgManufacturingMonth2016.2.jpg      

Topics: Manufacturing, Massachusetts Manufacturing

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