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Rick Lord

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Proposed Assessment Will Hurt Employers Who Provide Health Insurance

Posted by Rick Lord on Jan 26, 2017 3:00:40 PM

Governor Charlie Baker yesterday described his proposal for a $300 million health assessment on employers as an attempt “to wrestle with the fact that a huge portion of people who are working full-time are either not taking coverage that's available through their employer and going on MassHealth, or are working for people who aren't offering them coverage at all, and going on MassHealth."

health_care.jpgHe added, according to State House News Service, that “the centerpiece of this budget really is a smart and common-sense approach to address the problem of costs being shifted from private sector employers for their employees onto state government."

Set aside for the moment the questionable premise of rampant cost shifting in a commonwealth where 76 percent of employers offer health insurance compared to 55 percent in the rest of the country.

The important point is that the governor’s sweeping proposal goes far beyond targeting employers who offer no health insurance, and instead penalizes employers who already offer high-quality insurance coverage to their employees.

It appears that money, not fairness, is driving the new fair-share assessment.

The administration plan would impose a $2,000-per-employee fee upon companies at which at least 80 percent of full-time worker equivalents do not take the company’s offer of health insurance, and that do not make a minimum contribution of $4,950 annual contribution for each full-time worker. If 70 percent of a company’s employees accept company health insurance, the company would be assessed $2,000 per employee for the number of employees represented by the 10 percent difference.

The employer assessment, which would bring an estimated $300 million into state coffers, represents a revival of the so-called fair share contribution plan that was a linchpin of the 2006 universal health care law in Massachusetts before it was repealed to make way for the federal Affordable Care Act. The state employer mandate was repealed in 2013 as lawmakers and former Gov. Deval Patrick worked to bring Massachusetts into compliance with federal health-care reform.

AIM asked multiple employers of varying sizes to determine whether they would be subject to an assessment under the governor’s plan. Every one of the companies, from small manufacturers to international financial institutions to corner retailers, reported that they would face assessments. Most fell short of the 80 percent threshold because of employees using spousal health plans or because of the calculation of full-time equivalent employees.

“There is widespread concern among responsible employers that they are being dragged into an assessment intended for companies that provide no health coverage,” said Katie Holahan, Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

Holahan said AIM has developed an online calculator that will allow employers to determine how much they might owe under the governor’s proposal.

AIM opposes the employer assessment because the growing shortfall at Masshealth, which provides health insurance to 1.9 million low-income Massachusetts residents, is attributable solely to problems arising from the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA), a law that may well be repealed by the time Massachusetts solves its Medicaid problems. 

ACA made access to health insurance an entitlement based on expanded income eligibility.  Under the Massachusetts health care reform law of 2006, employees who were offered employer-sponsored health insurance were ineligible for MassHealth.  The ACA reversed that policy and allowed employees to decline employer coverage and still seek insurance through MassHealth.

The change created a migration of newly-eligible individuals from their employer-sponsored insurance to MassHealth, substantially increasing the commonwealth’s financial burden.  ACA made it an economically rational choice for eligible residents.

As MassHealth enrollment grows, the commonwealth experiences the reality that employers have faced for years - the high cost of health care coverage in this state threatens the underpinnings of the state economy.  This challenging moment underscores the fact that policymakers have concentrated too heavily on access issues instead of controlling the cost of health insurance, and now face a renewed imperative to lower costs for everyone in Massachusetts.

AIM looks forward to working with the administration and the Legislature to find a fair solution to the commonwealth’s challenging health-care financing issues.

Topics: Health Care Costs, Health Insurance, Charlie Baker

Dear President-Elect Trump

Posted by Rick Lord on Nov 9, 2016 2:42:14 PM

Dear President-Elect Trump,

Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) and its 4,000 member-employers congratulate you on your election as President of the United States. Massachusetts employers, large and small, from all sectors of the economy, affirm our commitment to unifying this great nation and to restoring faith in our economic and government institutions.

AIM employers proudly provide jobs that allow 650,000 people to build lives for themselves and their families. We embrace the notion that private sector has the unique ability - and responsibility – to create the common wealth for the citizens of Massachusetts.

The days after a hard-fought presidential election have traditionally been a time to mend the divisions in our country, with political parties and nominees moving beyond the harshness of the campaign season and putting our nation, and our democratic system, first before all else.

We take encouragement from your words early this morning:

“Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division; have to get together. To all Republicans and Democrats and independents across this nation, I say it is time for us to come together as one united people.”

The rancor and divisiveness of both the presidential campaign and the general political discourse make unity not just a polite platitude in 2016, but an essential part of reinvigorating our democracy. We are reminded of the words of Abraham Lincoln: "America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."

Associated Industries of Massachusetts looks forward to working with the Trump Administration to strengthen the United States economy and raise the economic fortunes of all Americans. We certainly will not agree on all issues, but AIM believes in the transformative power of political debate and will make our voices heard respectfully on all issues affecting employers.

We commit to maintain a constructive dialogue and an approach guided by an unwavering commitment to a greater purpose. AIM has already taken that approach by creating a long-term economic plan for Massachusetts called The Blueprint for the Next Century.

The Blueprint articulates the objectives, priorities, hopes and dreams of Massachusetts employers:

  1. Develop the best system in the world for educating and training workers with the skills needed to allow companies to succeed in a rapidly changing global economy.
  2. Support business formation and expansion by creating a uniformly competitive economic structure, a structure that must include a reliable transportation system.
  3. Establish a world-class regulatory system that ensures the health and welfare of society in a manner that meets the highest standards of efficiency, predictability, transparency and responsiveness.
  4. Moderate the immense long-term burden that health care and energy costs place on business growth.

Those objectives inform the position of Massachusetts employers on a host of issues you will confront upon taking office, from encouraging fair agreements on international trade to creating a balanced National Labor Relations Board to correcting problems with federal health-care reform that threaten the economic survival of small companies here in the commonwealth.

Most immediately, the employers who create prosperity in Massachusetts eagerly anticipate your efforts to accomplish the “urgent task of rebuilding our nation and renewing the American dream.” 

Congratulations again.

Topics: Elections, Massachusetts economy, Donald Trump

Marijuana Legalization Harmful to Business

Posted by Rick Lord on Oct 19, 2016 10:30:00 AM

A proposed law on the November ballot to legalize and commercialize marijuana in Massachusetts would reverse decades of hard-won progress by employers to create safe and drug-free workplaces.

VoteHereSign.jpgQuestion 4 would place employers in the untenable position of determining whether an employee who tests positive for marijuana, used legally under state law, is too impaired to operate a machine or drive a company vehicle safely. It would also create a legal nightmare for employers caught between a state law that permits private use of marijuana and a federal law - often the overriding jurisdiction in employment scenarios - that prohibits marijuana use.

That’s why the Board of Directors of AIM has joined an extraordinary coalition of public officials, civic leaders and businesses urging a “no” vote on Question 4. The coalition includes Governor Charlie Baker; House Speaker Robert DeLeo; Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh; Attorney General Maura Healey; Members of Congress Joe Kennedy, III, Stephen Lynch, Nikki Tsongas and William Keating; Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley and the Roman Catholic Bishops of Massachusetts; the Massachusetts Hospital Association; the Massachusetts Medical Society; and the Massachusetts Municipal Association

A survey conducted by AIM earlier this year indicates that employers oppose Question 4 by a wide margin.

Sixty-two percent of employers said they would vote “No” on the pot legalization referendum due to appear on the November 1 ballot. Thirty-eight percent were in favor.

The proposed ballot law would authorize individuals 21 and over to possess up to one ounce of marijuana outside of their home and up to ten ounces of marijuana in their residences. It calls for taxes on marijuana sales and creates a Cannabis Control Commission to handle regulation and licensing.

If approved, the new law would take effect on December 15.

“We’re not surprised by the poll results given the concerns being expressed to us by member employers,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

“How will an employer respond to a worker operating heavy equipment on a job site under the influence of marijuana? Many jobs, particularly those in safety-sensitive fields like transportation or manufacturing, must adhere to federal regulations that still prohibit the use of any substance that creates impairment.”

In fact, no breathalyzer-type technology exists to measure the degree of impairment suffered by a marijuana user. Question 4 not only fails to establish an enforceable legal standard as exists in other states, but also fails to establish a standard by which employers may terminate or discipline an employee who may have used marijuana and could be a safety risk on the job.

The potential consequences are significant.

In Colorado, which legalized medical marijuana in 2010 and recreational marijuana in 2012, marijuana-related traffic deaths increased by 154 percent between 2006 and 2014. Emergency room hospital visits that were “likely related” to marijuana increased by 77 percent from 2011 to 2014; and drug-related suspensions/expulsions increased 40 percent from school years 2008/2009 to 2013/2014, according to a September 2015 report by the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Traffic Area, a collaboration of federal, state and local drug enforcement agencies.

Recent surveys have also indicated an increase in general marijuana use when states approve the legalization of marijuana. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, between 2012 and 2013 (when marijuana was legalized but states had yet to implement a regulatory framework) the percentage of adults who reported using marijuana jumped by more than 20 percent in Washington and Colorado.

Employers remain concerned that much of the increased marijuana usage in these states has come from high-potency edibles - THC-infused candy bars, gummies, cookies and soda – many packaged to look like candy and snacks. Almost half of all marijuana sales in Colorado, which was the first state to legalize, now come from edibles and concentrates.

The appeal of edible marijuana products to teen-agers is an issue for medical and behavior health organizations like the Massachusetts chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), and the Association for Behavioral Healthcare.

“The research shows that marijuana poses a risk for the young brain — those 25 and under — that is predisposed to emotional and mental health issues,” said NAMI Mass Executive Director Laurie Martinelli.

Marijuana legalization is among a handful of November ballot questions with implications for employers. AIM favors a proposal to lift the cap on charter schools and opposes questions that would end the use of Common Core educational standards and impose de-facto government price controls on hospitals.

AIM also opposes a proposed constitutional amendment that would impose a 4 percent surtax on income more than $1 million that could reach the ballot by 2018.

Topics: Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Ballot Questions

Power and Collaboration on Beacon Hill

Posted by Rick Lord on Sep 21, 2016 4:27:48 PM

An article in yesterday’s Boston Globe, Business lobby holds new sway on Beacon Hill, accurately reports that Associated Industries of Massachusetts exerts unique influence on Beacon Hill on behalf of employers.

statehousedome.jpgWe do. That’s why your company is a member.

Unfortunately, the article also distorts AIM’s position on an important piece of legislation - the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act – and contains a glaring factual error. I feel it is important to set the record straight.

The article reports that AIM opposed The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act during the 2015-2016 legislative session. But the article does not tell you that our opposition reflected legitimate concern among employers that the legislation duplicates existing law and provides an applicant or employee with the power to reject multiple and reasonable offers of accommodation by an employer.

The issue is similar to the recent debate over wage equity, in which AIM initially opposed a flawed bill meant to accomplish a goal we all supported. Far from exercising “veto power” over the House of Representatives, as one senator asserted to the Globe, AIM was able to work with House Speaker Robert DeLeo and the attorney general to develop an acceptable piece of legislation that we were ultimately proud to support and that Governor Charlie Baker signed.

The Globe article fails to mention that AIM has signaled the Legislature that we are willing to enter into the same type of negotiations on the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. AIM executives told reporter Frank Phillips on several occasions that the association supports fair treatment of pregnant women and is open to discussions to eliminate provisions of the bill that would place an undue burden on employers.

The article also inaccurately reports that Cape Air, the business owned by retiring Senator Dan Wolf, D-Harwich, is a member of Associated Industries of Massachusetts. For the record, Cape Air has not been a member of AIM since 2003.

As member employers you should be proud of that AIM represents your interests with unparalleled skill and integrity. You should also acknowledge that the Massachusetts House of Representatives is developing workable legislation for the people of Massachusetts by working collaboratively with the business community.

The bottom line of the Globe article is that no organization is more prominent in public policy debates that AIM.

Please contact me if you have any questions about the article or AIM’s positions.

 

Topics: Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Massachusetts senate, Massachusetts House of Representatives

A Statesmanlike Approach to Non-Competes

Posted by Rick Lord on Jul 25, 2016 7:54:02 AM

The 19th-century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli defined a statesman as “essentially a practical character” who works “to ascertain the needful, and the beneficial, and the most feasible manner in which affairs are to be carried on. 

DeLeo2016.jpgMassachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo displayed admirable statesmanship and determination in forging a consensus wage-equity bill under which workers will be fairly compensated regardless of gender while employers retain the ability to design competitive pay plans to attract and retain skilled employees. The bill won unanimous approval Saturday and is now on Governor Charlie Baker's desk.

Now, the speaker is putting his statesman’s hat back on in an effort to pass a compromise bill governing the use of non-compete agreements in Massachusetts. His efforts deserve the full-throated support of the employer community.

You know the non-compete issue by now. AIM has fought relentlessly for several years on behalf the vast majority of Massachusetts employers who wish to preserve the use of non-compete agreements to protect intellectual property. Efforts to ban the use of non-competes have been driven by a small group of well-heeled venture capitalists who cannot seem to master the idea that if you don’t like non-competes, just don’t use them.

Speaker DeLeo, as he did with wage equity, reached out to AIM and other business organizations to understand the concerns that employers had with a possible ban on non-competes. He wanted to limit the use of non-competes with low-income workers, teen-agers, interns and other categories of workers without harming companies seeking to prevent the loss of trade secrets worth millions of dollars.

The result was a compromise bill endorsed by the employer community that would limit non-competes to one year and give employees the opportunity to consult a lawyer when signing a non-compete, but not require companies that compensate employees at the time they sign non-competes to pay them again during the restricted period. The bill passed 149-0.

But the state Senate ignored the speaker’s carefully crafted compromise and passed its own bill with Draconian restrictions that would effectively end of the use of the documents in the Bay State. The Senate measure would limit non-compete agreements to three months and require employers to pay the full salary of the former employee during the restricted period. The bill would exempt anyone earning $130,000 or less from non-competes.

The issue now rests with a conference committee that will attempt to hammer out the differences between the two versions.

But the compromise and statesmanship on non-competes has already taken place. We urge the Senate to recognize the balanced compromise woven by Speaker DeLeo and to adopt the House version of the non-compete bill.

And we're not alone. Baker on Saturday announced that he supports the House bill "because he believes it better balances workers' abilities to seek new employment while ensuring cutting edge businesses can protect essential intellectual property."

AIM urges all its members to contact the conference committee and urge them to adopt the House version.

  Contact the Conference Commiittee

Topics: Employment Law, Non-Compete Agreements, Intellectual Property

100 Years of AIM and the Value of a Job

Posted by Rick Lord on Nov 16, 2015 7:30:00 AM

Editor's note - Richard C. Lord is President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Industries of Massachusetts. His comments come as AIM prepares to celebrate its 100th anniversary tonight.

I grew up in North Adams, in a world defined by family, community and work.

The three elements existed symbiotically – families bonded around common values; neighborhoods
joined together to form communities; and innovative employers created jobs that allowed hard-working people to support their families.

North Adams was a tightly-knit Berkshire County mill town where almost everyone you knew (and you knew most everyone) worked either at Sprague Electric, GE Pittsfield or North Adams Regional Hospital.

Few people in North Adams could tell you what Associated Industries of Massachusetts was, but we all grew up breathing the air of its accomplishments. So did kids raised in Southbridge around American Optical, in Springfield near UT Diesel Systems or in Quincy by the shipyard.

lord_alternate.medium

Not to mention the ballfields, parks and street signs that companies often donated.

All this came back to me late last year when my father, who spent 40 years working for General Electric in Pittsfield, passed away on the eve of the 100th anniversary of AIM. I thought about all the fathers and mothers who have worked hard at AIM-member companies during the past century so they might create a future for their children, take them on vacation, pay for trips to the emergency room, send them to college and then and enjoy a bit of retirement.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts conducts its public policy advocacy in the marble halls of the State House on Beacon Hill, but the ultimate value of what we and our 4,500 member employers do each day is found in thousands of living rooms around the commonwealth.

We work with government to help employers create the kind of economic opportunity that will allow more moms and dads to set down their tools, computers, briefcases and research notes at the end of the day and enjoy the kind of life for which we all hope in the next century.

Topics: Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Massachusetts economy, Jobs

A Welcome Political Consensus on Manufacturing

Posted by Rick Lord on Sep 25, 2015 5:10:22 PM

The commonwealth’s top political leaders agree that manufacturing has a bright future in Massachusetts - and that’s great news for the state economy.

manufacturingGovernor Charlie Baker, House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Senate President Stanley Rosenberg today joined a bipartisan group of business leaders, cabinet secretaries and legislators to kick off Manufacturing Month in Massachusetts from now through the end of October.

The event was organized by the Legislature's Manufacturing Caucus, chaired by Rep. John V. Fernandes, D-Milford, and Senator Eric Lesser, D-Longmeadow.

The observance is intended to highlight the importance of the manufacturing sector; to encourage students and workers to consider manufacturing as a pathway to a successful career; and to recognize the world-class companies, maker spaces and startups that make up the manufacturing sector from Boston to the Berkshires.

For me, as the CEO of the state’s largest employer association, the sight of elected officials from both parties standing together at the State House to celebrate the 7,500 manufacturing establishments in Massachusetts was heartening. Some political leaders may dismiss manufacturing as a dying industry, or overlook it entirely in the pursuit of the “technology sector,” but there is a clear and unified view in Massachusetts that manufacturing and technology are part of the same equation for success in creating jobs.  

More than 250,000 Massachusetts residents work in manufacturing businesses, which accounted for more than 10 percent of gross state product (GSP) - $45.06 billion - in 2013, the most recent year for which numbers are available. Manufacturing workers in Massachusetts earn an average pay of approximately $93,862 per year, among the highest in the country.

And manufacturers invest a far higher percentage of sales in research and development than non-manufacturing companies.

The six companies that took part in today’s ceremony underscore the diversity and promise of making things in Massachusetts – from biopharmaceutical leader and AIM member Biogen to clean-tech startup Greentown Labs, to Maybury Material Handling to grinding firm Boston Centerless to contract machining company Accurounds to another AIM member, officer furniture maker AIS.

The State House event is the first in a series of events scheduled throughout the month of October that will highlight best practices in workforce training, showcase programs that are available to employers and workers, and advance dialogue to address current work force challenges.

The observance will be broken up into five weeks, representing five regions of the state. AIM encourages manufacturers to participate in the celebration by hosting a tour, making a presentation at a local school, or attending one of the many events scheduled across the commonwealth. The weeks will be assigned as follows:

  • Week 1 (September 27-October 3): Central Mass/495/MetroWest 
  • Week 2 (October 4-10): Western Mass/Berkshires/Pioneer Valley
  • Week 3: (October 11-17): Northeast
  • Week 4: (October 18-24): Southeast/Cape & Islands
  • Week 5: (October 25-31): Greater Boston

Employers or school districts interested in participating in an open house in October can visit the following sites for more information, including guidance on how to successfully host an event.

Announcement of Manufacturing Month came one day after Governor Baker and several key administration officials discussed the challenges of training and educating the next generation of manufacturing workers during a meeting of the Massachusetts Workforce Professionals Association. I had the opportunity to introduce the governor at that event and to talk about AIM’s Blueprint for the Next Century, which recommends elevating the role vocational education and other steps to close the skills gaps that threatens to impede the growth of manufacturers in years to come.

 

Topics: Manufacturing, Massachusetts Manufacturing

Speaker Outlines Clear Economic Strategy

Posted by Rick Lord on Feb 12, 2015 12:46:04 PM

DeLeogoodBalance the budget with no new taxes or fees.

Extend economic growth beyond Greater Boston.

Reduce unnecessary regulatory barriers.

Stabilize energy costs.

Develop an educated work force.

House Speaker Robert DeLeo checked off all the important issues yesterday in outlining a clear and well-reasoned strategy to improve the Massachusetts economy. Speaking to House members at the start of the 2015-2016 session, DeLeo echoed many of the recommendations of AIM’s new Blueprint for the Next Century long-term plan to expand economic opportunity for the citizens of the commonwealth.

The Democratic speaker’s approach is also remarkably consistent with Republican Governor Charlie Baker’s agenda on opposition to new taxes and support for streamlining burdensome regulations. Such agreement between two of the commonwealth’s three top political leaders, coupled with Senate President Stanley Rosenberg’s reputation for pragmatism on economic issues, suggest a predictable environment for employers in the next several years.

“In the coming session, we will reaffirm our commitment to economic success. We will look to support the innovative programs that are spurring growth in Boston and beyond,” DeLeo told House members.

“Even as we face unforeseen fiscal circumstances, we will find inventive ways to extend our economic success to every sector of the commonwealth. I’ve seen what many of these regions have to offer: the pockets of innovation, the entrepreneurs, the people who make Massachusetts work.”

John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at Associated Industries of Massachusetts, said DeLeo’s approach reflects growing consensus among policymakers for the need to create a uniformly positive business climate across all economic sectors and in all regions of the state.

“The cornerstone of the relationship between employers and government is the ability of policymakers to manage the budget, control costs and provide services efficiently. Speaker DeLeo is clearly committed to doing that in way that will then allow the commonwealth to address some of its long-term economic challenges,” Regan said.

The Massachusetts constitution requires legislators and the governor to maintain a balanced budget. Governor Deval Patrick and state lawmakers managed to balance the books during the Great Recession and recovery with two tax increases – a sales tax increase from 5 to 6.25 percent in 2009 and a $500 million jump in the gasoline and other taxes in 2013 – along with a multi-year drop in the corporate excise tax.

DeLeo said tax-and-fee increases harm working families.

“We know many families’ budgets are stressed to the limit. We will not add to that burden. For that reason, the budget plan that comes out of the Committee on Ways and Means will contain no new taxes and fees,” the speaker said.

DeLeo made his comments on the same day that the House approved legislation to fill a $768 million gap in the current fiscal year with a mix of redirected revenues and spending cuts. The legislation establishes a corporate tax amnesty program and would redirect capital gains tax receipts into the general fund while trimming spending across state government.

Topics: Massachusetts Legislature, Massachusetts economy, Massachusetts House of Representatives, House Speaker Robert DeLeo

A Step Toward Better Regulation

Posted by Rick Lord on Jan 20, 2015 7:25:26 AM

One of the key recommendations of AIM’s Blueprint for the Next Century is for Massachusetts to establish a world-class state regulatory system that ensures the welfare of society in a manner that meets the highest standards for efficiency, predictability, transparency and responsiveness.

WolfMeadowFarmThe Baker administration took an important first step toward that objective last week when it imposed a temporary freeze on new state regulations until March 31. The ban underscores the governor’s determination to embark upon the kind of long-term regulatory reform he discussed at the November 14 AIM Executive Forum.

Administration and Finance Secretary Kristen Lepore was particularly encouraging in a memo to Cabinet secretaries. She said the administration's goal is to "modernize and simplify" state regulations "in a manner that enables rather than encumbers" the state's citizens.

"A regulation should be straightforward, effective, and no more burdensome than necessary to achieve its purpose," Lepore wrote. "No regulation should be adopted (or remain in place) unless it is easy to understand and meets a specific, discreet need."

Amen.

AIM is develping a plan to provide Massachusetts with a world-class regulatory system. Our suggestions inlude:

  • The governor should appoint an independent ombudsperson to review comments, suggestions and complaints from employers about ineffective state regulations and/or the manner in which those regulations are enforced. The ombudsperson would have the authority to determine which regulations and/or enforcement issues represent real impediments to growth and recommend changes to the Legislature or the executive branch.
  • Encourage regulators and employers to adopt “smart partnerships” to ensure that government-business interactions solve problems instead of propping up bureaucracies.
  • Engage willing employers who are global leaders in productivity and process improvement to streamline the operation of state government agencies. General Electric, an AIM member, provided just such a service for the New York State Highway Department at the request of Governor Andrew Cuomo. GE Capital used its expertise in lean process to help the Highway Department reduce the processing time for curb-cut requests from 70 days to three days.

We look forward to the debate and welcome the initial action by the new administration.

Topics: Regulation, Charlie Baker

AIM, MindEdge Announce E-Learning Initiative

Posted by Rick Lord on Sep 15, 2014 9:16:06 AM

Thousands of Massachusetts employers will gain access to state-of-the-art online professional development courses under an alliance announced today by Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) and Waltham-based MindeEdge Inc.

AIM_MindEdgeAIM, the largest employer association in Massachusetts, will expand its existing lineup of human resources, legal compliance and management education courses with interactive e-learning offerings from MindEdge in areas such as project management, sustainability and finance. AIM and MindEdge will also collaborate on new courses important to employers such as LEAN management.

AIM spent a great deal of time seeking an online learning solution that reflects the excellence and high standards our member employers have come to expect from our in-person seminars and on-site training and education. MindEdge was founded in 1998 by Harvard and MIT educators and the company continues to innovate in the rapidly changing landscape of online education.

The 4,500 member employers of AIM are delighted to be working with such a world-class company located right here in Massachusetts.

“Employers in growing numbers are going online for employee training and education, but AIM wanted to be certain that the online courses we offered to members were effective and met the learning objectives of busy employers. We have done that with MindEdge,” said Gary MacDonald, Executive Vice President of the AIM Employers Resource Group.

All of the courses are mobile-enabled, meaning that employers and their workers will have the option to access information via a desktop, laptop, tablet or smartphone.

MindEdge specializes in higher education and professional development content and technology solutions. The company’s webtexts feature narrative, interactive learning case studies and simulations, as well as adaptive learning technology to maximize learner mastery of the content.

The MindEdge platform also includes a learning-management system that allows company training managers to monitor the progress of employees taking each course.

The alliance will provide the 4,500 member employers of AIM access to online courses in areas such as:

  • Communication
  • Creativity and Innovation
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Finance
  • Human Resource Management
  • International Trade
  • Leadership
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Nonprofit Management
  • Project Management
  • Sustainable Management

“We’re pleased to join AIM in offering online learning that is both convenient and effective for Massachusetts employers,” said Jefferson Flanders, CEO and President of MindEdge.

“AIM is acknowledged to be the leading provider of management and human resources training and education to Massachusetts companies. MindEdge will seek to extend that commitment to quality into the online world.”

Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) improves the financial performance of member companies through a unique combination of lobbying, management and human-resource services that allow employers to control the environment both inside and outside their businesses. AIM provides management and HR services that increase workforce productivity and improve the recruitment, retention and training of talented people.

MindEdge, a learning company based in Waltham, provides leadership, management, communication, and educational solutions for organizations to help them meet their objectives.

Topics: Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Education, Training

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