AIMBlog_Logo_Resized

Massachusetts Exports Rise; Trade Policy Remains Unclear

Posted by Kristen Rupert on Feb 16, 2017 9:16:13 AM

Recently-released year-end 2016 trade statistics tell a positive story for Massachusetts.

Product exports from the commonwealth increased 2 percent last year, outperforming many other US states.  Massachusetts exports totaled nearly $26 Billion in 2016.

international.flagssmall.jpgAt the same time, the relationship with our top three trade partners—Canada, Mexico and China—is likely to change as a result of new trade policies sought by the Trump administration.  What might this mean for Massachusetts companies?

The new president and his executive team have committed to renegotiating long-standing trade relationships and agreements.  First in line is NAFTA—the trilateral North America Free Trade Agreement among the US, Canada and Mexico that took effect 23 years ago.

 Many experts agree that changes to NAFTA are long overdue.  However, there is concern that the Trump administration may abandon NAFTA altogether and pursue separate bilateral agreements—one with Canada and a separate one with Mexico.  This would create significant disruption for many companies with global supply chains across North America. 

The new Trump trade team is not yet installed, which will likely delay negotiations about NAFTA.  Advocates within the manufacturing community, however, are already gathering stories about how individual US companies have grown jobs as a result of business with Canada and Mexico.   Getting this data to Congressional leaders and the new presidential administration will be critical in persuading Trump trade professionals to tweak, and not eliminate, NAFTA. 

Another proposal in play is the border tax.  Imports would be taxed at a rate up to 20 percent.  A complementary plan to reduce the overall US corporate tax rate is being touted as a potential offset.  The border tax would mean that large importers such as Walmart and Target would suffer and likely pass along cost increases to customers, while big exporters—Caterpillar, GE, Boeing - would benefit.  Small companies dependent on components produced in China or Mexico would also be hard hit by an import tax.  As with all tax rate changes, we’ll see winners and losers. 

No China trade announcements have been made since President Trump was inaugurated.  His telephone call last week with China president Xi Jinping was a first step toward repairing the damage caused by Mr. Trump’s earlier denunciation of the US’ long-standing “one China” policy.  Mr. Trump had suggested imposing tariffs of up to 45 percent on imports from China, but that proposal has not yet gained traction.

In a promising development, Mr. Trump last week signaled his support for the US Export-Import Bank, which has been operating for more than a year without a board quorum and unable to approve loans of more than $10 million.  Mr. Trump’s statement represents a departure from his previous skepticism about Ex-Im Bank. The president may make a statement about Ex-Im during his visit to Boeing in South Carolina tomorrow. 

If you are one of the more than 10,000 exporting companies in Massachusetts and you have concerns, praise or questions about proposed federal trade policy, please let AIM know.  We are in regular communication with industry and government leaders and your insights are invaluable as we convey what’s important about trade and growing the Massachusetts economy. 

Topics: International Trade, Massachusetts economy, Donald Trump

State of Massachusetts Business - The Age of Uncertainty

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jan 20, 2017 10:47:52 AM

The success of diverse Massachusetts companies like VIBRAM and IBM Watson Health underscores the need for employers to engage in public policy debates, Associated Industries of Massachusetts President Richard C. Lord said Friday.

Lord used his annual State of Massachusetts Business address to more than 350 business leaders to call for call upon elected officials and all involved in public policy to set aside polemics and engage instead in civil debate on behalf of the large number of Americans who clearly feel restive, uneasy and suspicious of institutions like government and business.    

“Let us resolve to talk with each other, not at each other. Let us resolve to speak in full sentences, not 140-character missives that reduce to two dimensions the complex issues with which we must wrestle,” Lord said just hours before Donald J. Trump took the oath of office as the 45th president of the United States.

“Let us seek bipartisan consensus rather than intractable fiscal cliffs and government by inaction. Let us make hope and hard work our watchwords and not allow cynicism to leave undone the important work of business and government.”

Lord warned that conservative administrations in Washington often prompt progressives in Massachusetts to make the commonwealth an example of big government, higher taxes, inefficient regulation and fiscal instability. Employers are already on the defensive, he said, having barely held off scores of expensive social-engineering bills ranging from a ban on non-compete agreements to the creation of a state-run pension system for private-sector workers.

The first step for business, according to Mr. Lord, is to articulate a positive agenda for economic growth. He noted that AIM is attempting to do that through its Blueprint for the Next Century, which makes four primary recommendations to create economic growth and opportunity for the people of Massachusetts:

  • Government and business must develop the best system in the world for educating and training workers with the skills to allow Massachusetts companies to succeed in the global economy.
  • Massachusetts must create a uniformly competitive economic structure, including an efficient transportation infrastructure, across all industries, geographic regions and populations.
  • Establish a world-class state regulatory system that meets the highest standards for efficiency, predictability, transparency, and responsiveness.
  • Massachusetts must find a way to moderate the substantial burden that health care and energy costs place on business growth.

A panel of business leaders responded to Lord’s speech and underscored the sense of uncertainty surrounding the transfer of power in Washington.

Robert Reynolds, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Putnam Investments, expressed optimism that the new Trump Administration and Republican Congress will accelerate economic growth and move away from the monetary approach that has dominated US economic policy.

“They already have so-called shovel ready plans,” on taxes, replacement of federal health reform and other issues, Reynolds said.

Donna Cupelo, New England Regional President of Verizon, said that a national technology sector that did not strongly support Trump is now “getting its boots back on” to address issues such as infrastructure, taxes and work-force development.

Lisa Chamberlain, Managing Partner of The Chamberlain Group in Great Barrington, said the potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act’s tax on medical-device companies is good news for her company’s customers, but repeal also creates uncertainty for small employers like herself.

“The instability of the present moment brings me some concerns and it concerns some of my neighbors,” she said.

Topics: Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Massachusetts economy, Donald Trump

Trump Policies on International Trade Take Shape

Posted by Kristen Rupert on Jan 5, 2017 11:27:58 AM

President-Elect Donald Trump’s international trade leadership team is now complete. 

international.flagssmall.jpgRobert Lighthizer was announced this week as US Trade Representative.  Lighthizer joins incoming Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, new National Trade Council head Peter Navarro, and Jason Greenblatt, special representative for international negotiations, as Trump’s picks to set and execute US trade policy.

 What might we expect from this team?  What are the issues to watch in 2017?

NAFTA.  The North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada is widely expected to be renegotiated.  An update of NAFTA is welcomed by many trade experts.  NAFTA came into force in 1994, before the rise of the Internet.  Because of the breadth, depth, complexity, and influence of technology on trade today, new rules are needed.  Mexico and Canada have signaled a willingness to modernize the treaty—under certain conditions.  Scrapping NAFTA altogether, which Trump previously championed, would threaten millions of US jobs.

China.  Trump speaks frequently about China’s currency manipulation, steel-dumping and aggressive trade practices.  His trade appointees are likely to stand tough on China—and this toughness may serve the US well.  However, a proposal to hit some China imports with significant tariffs is meeting resistance. AIM has heard from Massachusetts manufacturers concerned that components they source from China may become prohibitively expensive.

Russia.  The US levied trade sanctions on Russia in March 2014, after the Crimea incursion.  Many European countries did the same.  Given Trump’s frequent praise of Russian president Vladimir Putin and his desire to strengthen ties with Russia, might US sanctions be lifted?  Complicating the US-Russia relationship is Russia’s ongoing cyberwarfare against the US, which appears to have affected the recent US presidential election.   Trump’s Secretary of State designee Rex Tillerson, CEO of ExxonMobil, is known to have business ties with Russia.  More will be learned during confirmation hearings.

Brexit.  The 2016 vote by citizens of the United Kingdom to leave the European Union surprised the world.  New UK Prime Minister Theresa May is overseeing “Brexit” and has proposed March 2017 as the start date for the two-year process.  However, the recent requirement for a Parliamentary vote to approve Brexit and the appointment of a new UK ambassador to the EU have muddied the Brexit waters.  The UK is searching worldwide for hundreds of trade negotiators needed to lead trade talks with the EU.  Although US President-elect Trump has signaled interest in negotiating a bilateral trade agreement with the UK, that country cannot negotiate any new trade agreements while it is still part of the EU.  So any US-UK agreement would have to wait until 2019 or 2020.  In the meantime, US and UK diplomats are working to continue and grow the US-UK trade relationship.

Key Europe Elections.  The Brexit vote was the first step in the resurgence of populism in Europe.  Concerns about immigration and terrorism have driven European voters to rebuff convention and vote for change.  Italy’s recent vote was a win for populism and resulted in the resignation of the Italian Prime Minister.  France is holding its presidential election in May.  Current president Francois Hollande will not seek re-election.  Former Prime Minister Francois Fillon beat ex-president Nicolas Sarkozy in the primary to become the conservative nominee for president.  Marine Le Pen, leader of the Far Right National Front, is her party’s nominee.  A Socialist Party nominee will be selected this month.  In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel will run for a fourth term in the Fall 2017 elections.  She has been Chancellor for 11 years and she leads the Christian Democrats Union party.  The EU-US trade relationship is the largest trade relationship in the world, so any changes in leadership in the key EU countries will affect US commerce.   

Other issues to watch:

The US Export-Import Bank lacks a quorum and cannot approve loans of more than $10 million.  Will the new administration break the logjam?  Cuba is now welcoming US commercial cruise lines and airlines.  JetBlue—Massport’s largest carrier—hopes to be approved for future non-stop flights between Logan Airport and Havana—but only if the further opening of the Cuba market continues under a new US presidential administration.

Israel is not a significant trade partner for Massachusetts, but there’s a strong Massachusetts-Israel talent pipeline and Israeli-founded companies represent thousands of jobs in the Bay State.  Will the recent UN vote on Israeli settlements affect that relationship?  Will the Trump administration’s pick for US Ambassador to Israel move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem?

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is considered to be on life support, as President-elect Trump has promised to withdraw from this 12-country pact.  Key concerns on abandoning TPP are the US relationship with its long-time trading partner Japan, the rising influence of China in the Pacific region, and the likelihood that many Asian countries will now sign on to the China-led Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Trade Agreement, or R-CEP, which will lower trade barriers in the region but will not benefit the US.

Other US Free Trade Agreements.  The US now has 14 FTA’s covering 20 countries.   Will the Trump trade team renegotiate these?

It’s going to be an interesting year for trade.

Topics: International Trade, Manufacturing, Donald Trump

Business Confidence Hits 12-Year High

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jan 3, 2017 7:30:00 AM

Confidence among Massachusetts employers hit its highest level in 12 years during December amid the prospect of growth initiatives from the new administration in Washington and a continued strong state economy.

BCI.December.2016.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose 2.3 points to 60.4 last month, a full 5.1 points higher than its level in December 2015 and the highest reading since December 2004. It marked the fourth consecutive monthly increase in sentiment among employers in a commonwealth where the unemployment rate recently fell to 2.9 percent.

The November and December BCI readings mirror the post-election rally in U.S. financial markets, which have risen five percent as President-Elect Donald Trump prepares to work with a Republican Congress on business-friendly issues as tax reductions, regulatory reform and infrastructure spending. The AIM survey showed a 5.5-point jump in confidence in the national economy last month, leaving that indicator at its highest level since 2007.

“Massachusetts employers are taking the president-elect at his word that he will prioritize economic growth at the national level, especially if he is able to work with Congressional Democrats on a $1 trillion infrastructure initiative,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“But employer enthusiasm is also based upon a solid economic expansion during 2016 that most analysts believe will continue in a methodical manner though the first half of 2017.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators Mostly Higher

Almost all of the sub-indices based on selected questions or categories of employer were up in December.

The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, gained 2 points to 61.8, leaving it 5.5 points ahead of the same time last year.

The increase in the U.S. Index of national business conditions put that figure 7.5 points higher than its level of a year ago, but still short of the Massachusetts index. It marked the 80th consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, increased 2.2 points to 59.1 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, rose 2.5 points to 61.7. The future outlook was 5.5 points better than a year ago and higher than at any point since March 2015.

Operational Views Strengthen

The sub-indices bearing on survey respondents’ own operations also strengthened considerably.

The Company Index, reflecting overall business conditions, rose 1.4 points to 60.9 while the Sales Index increased 3.2 points to 61.4. The Employment Index was the only indicator to lose ground, falling 0.2 points to 57.2.

The AIM survey found that nearly 38 percent of respondents reported adding staff during the past six months while 19 percent reduced employment. Expectations for the next six months were stable – 37 percent hiring and only 10 percent downsizing.

“One of the most positive results of the December survey is that business confidence is strengthening uniformly across almost every sector of the economy,” said Elliot Winer, Chief Economist, Winer Economic Consulting and a BEA member.

“Employers both large and small, manufacturers and non-manufacturers, from the Pioneer Valley to Great Boston are more optimistic about their prospects than at any time since prior to the Great Recession.”

The BCI Manufacturing Index jumped 0.6 points during the month and 2.6 points for the year. The overall Business Confidence Index among non-manufacturers was 63.3 compared to 56.7 for manufacturing companies.

Companies in the eastern part of the Massachusetts were slightly more optimistic at 61.4 than those in the western part of the state at 57.6.

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also a BEA member, said employers appear to be encouraged by the prospect that President-Elect Donald Trump and a Republican Congress will be able to pass their tax and regulatory agenda.

At the same time, Lord said, there remains uncertainty about a possible repeal of federal health Care reform and the future of international trade agreements that are critical to Massachusetts companies.

“The only certainty appears to be uncertainty for the next six months,” Lord said.

“The key will be to ensure that any tax reductions and regulatory reforms made on the national level are not obviated by state measures intended to make Massachusetts a progressive ‘model’ for the rest of the country.”

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Donald Trump

Employer Confidence Surges

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Dec 6, 2016 9:18:57 AM

Employer confidence in Massachusetts surged during November amid a post-election economic rally that saw financial markets rise to record levels and the state unemployment rate drop to 3.3 percent.

BCI.November.2016.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose 1.9 points to 58.1 last month, 1.2 points higher than its level in November 2015. The third consecutive monthly increase in employer sentiment reflected across-the-board bullishness about the state and federal economies, along with a strong recovery of confidence among Massachusetts manufacturers.

U.S. financial markets rose three percent to record highs in the weeks following the unexpected election of Donald J. Trump as president. In Massachusetts, meanwhile, the news was even better as the jobless rate fell to its lowest level since April 2001.

“Employers and investors alike put aside their initial concerns about a Trump presidency and decided that the president-elect would prioritize conventional economic growth measures such as infrastructure investment and tax cuts,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“How long will that confidence last? It may depend upon President Trump’s commitment to following through on issues that employers are less likely to support, such as setting aside the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement and dismantling federal health-care reform.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

All of the sub-indices based on selected questions or categories of employer were up in November.
The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, gained 1.9 points to 59.8, leaving it a healthy 1.5 points ahead of the same time last year. The U.S. Index of national business conditions rose 2.8 points to move into optimistic territory for the first time since July.

Employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than about the national economy for 79 consecutive months.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, increased 0.9 points to 56.9 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, surged 2.9 points to 59.2. The future outlook was 1.2 points better than a year ago and higher than at any point since March 2015.

The sub-indices bearing on survey respondents’ own operations also strengthened considerably.

The Company Index, reflecting overall business conditions, rose 1.6 points to 59.5, while the Employment Index moved up 2 points to 57.4 and the Sales Index gained 2.7 points.

The AIM survey found that nearly 39 percent of respondents reported adding staff during the past six months while 19 percent reduced employment. Expectations for the next six months were stable – 37 percent hiring and only 10 percent downsizing.

“The most encouraging element of the November BCI is the degree to which employers are translating their overall optimism about the economy into optimism about their own plans for sales growth and hiring,” said Alan Clayton-Matthews, Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University and a BEA member.

He noted that manufacturing companies are driving much of the overall rise in business confidence after several years of concern about weakness in overseas export markets in Europe and Asia.

“Optimistic manufacturers are good for the Massachusetts economy,” Clayton-Matthews said.

The BCI Manufacturing Index jumped 2.6 points during the month and 4.1 points for the year. Still, the overall Business Confidence Index among non-manufacturers was 60.1 compared to 56.1 for manufacturing companies.
Companies in the eastern part of the Massachusetts were slightly more optimistic at 59.2 than those in the western part of the state at 57.4.

AIM’s President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also a BEA member, said the surprise election of a president with no record in public office upon which to make judgments will make 2017 an uncertain time for Massachusetts employers and the state economy.

“Will President Trump and the Republican Congress succeed in reducing corporate taxes? Will they keep their promise to simplify the regulatory structure? What will the potential scrapping of health-care reform mean to Massachusetts? And will the new president follow through on his intent to end or renegotiate trade agreements important to employers? That’s a lot of uncertainty,” Lord said.

“The good news is that Massachusetts remains one of the strongest state economies in the nation thanks to years of sound fiscal management and attention by elected officials to the needs of employers. We have every expectation that Governor Baker and the Legislature will follow the same course in 2017-2018.”

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Donald Trump

Trump on Trade: More Questions than Answers

Posted by Kristen Rupert on Dec 1, 2016 8:30:00 AM

What will happen to U.S. trade under the new Trump administration?  Which voices in the Cabinet and Congress will prevail?  Are free trade deals dead?  Will the U.S. impose high tariffs on China and Mexico? Will we become more protectionist?  Will companies be punished for creating jobs overseas or rewarded for keeping jobs state-side?

international.flagssmall.jpgAnswers to these questions remain unknown.  It’s still uncertain how the new presidential administration will proceed on trade.  Although candidate Trump campaigned on a strong anti-trade platform targeting China, Mexico, NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) and the TPP (Trans-Pacific Trade Pact), President-Elect Trump is already softening some of his rhetoric.

AIM has been engaged in discussions with state and federal political leaders, company executives, trade organizations, Congressional staff members, and seasoned trade professionals to understand how to keep US international trade fair and unencumbered and help Massachusetts companies continue to prosper.  Here’s what we know:

  1. Although there’s general agreement that trade is critical for jobs and the economy, employers need to do a better job telling the story of how trade has helped companies grow and create jobs.
  2. Manufacturing, an industry important to President-elect Trump, is a vital part of the U.S. and Massachusetts economies, responsible for millions of jobs and a significant component of GDP. Most manufacturers export or send their finished products up the supply chain to larger exporters—meaning that international trade is key to business success.
  3. NAFTA has been a strong driver for economic growth in the U.S., although not all parts of the U.S. have benefitted evenly. NAFTA can be renegotiated and modernized, but scrapping it would be disruptive and damaging to supply chains, investment and more.
  4. Job losses in manufacturing over the past several decades have been due in significant part to automation, not solely to overseas production.
  5. Training and re-training of displaced workers needs to be a priority on the state and federal levels through vocational schools, community colleges and other initiatives.
  6. Canada, Mexico and China are the three top trade partners for Massachusetts. Any disruption of trade across our northern or southern borders threatens thousands of jobs in the Bay State.
  7. China is a valuable import source and export destination for Massachusetts. Millions of Chinese citizens entering the middle class represent strong trade potential.  High tariffs or a U.S. trade war with China would have a significant negative impact on our citizens and companies. 
  8. Under Trump, the US Trade Representative (USTR) job may be downgraded from a Cabinet-level position to a senior-level administrator within the US Department of Commerce. This would put the U.S. at a significant disadvantage at the negotiating table.
  9. Trump needs early wins on trade. Recent negotiations with Ford and Carrier, who are scaling back plans to move jobs out of the U.S., may help with this.  As one expert noted, Trump is perhaps less anti-trade and more “pro-good deals.”

So, what can you do?

Tell your personal stories about trade - how you identified a new market for your product, how you work with international customers to meet their needs, how you’ve grown jobs at your company because of global trade.  Share these stories with your state and federal elected officials—and with AIM.  Many jobs depend on trade—that message needs to be delivered to lawmakers.

Stay informed.  Participate in events at which trade will be discussed.  Strengthen your existing trade relationships.  Communicate regularly with your international customers.  Reach out to potential clients in new markets.  Identify sticky trade problems that need to be solved.

Finally, remember that countries have been trading goods and services across borders since the beginning of time.  Presidents and prime ministers may come and go, but trade relationships persist.  Even in tough times, good companies find a way to meet customer needs and make deals happen. 

Topics: Associated Industries of Massachusetts, International Trade, Donald Trump

Dear President-Elect Trump

Posted by Rick Lord on Nov 9, 2016 2:42:14 PM

Dear President-Elect Trump,

Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) and its 4,000 member-employers congratulate you on your election as President of the United States. Massachusetts employers, large and small, from all sectors of the economy, affirm our commitment to unifying this great nation and to restoring faith in our economic and government institutions.

AIM employers proudly provide jobs that allow 650,000 people to build lives for themselves and their families. We embrace the notion that private sector has the unique ability - and responsibility – to create the common wealth for the citizens of Massachusetts.

The days after a hard-fought presidential election have traditionally been a time to mend the divisions in our country, with political parties and nominees moving beyond the harshness of the campaign season and putting our nation, and our democratic system, first before all else.

We take encouragement from your words early this morning:

“Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division; have to get together. To all Republicans and Democrats and independents across this nation, I say it is time for us to come together as one united people.”

The rancor and divisiveness of both the presidential campaign and the general political discourse make unity not just a polite platitude in 2016, but an essential part of reinvigorating our democracy. We are reminded of the words of Abraham Lincoln: "America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."

Associated Industries of Massachusetts looks forward to working with the Trump Administration to strengthen the United States economy and raise the economic fortunes of all Americans. We certainly will not agree on all issues, but AIM believes in the transformative power of political debate and will make our voices heard respectfully on all issues affecting employers.

We commit to maintain a constructive dialogue and an approach guided by an unwavering commitment to a greater purpose. AIM has already taken that approach by creating a long-term economic plan for Massachusetts called The Blueprint for the Next Century.

The Blueprint articulates the objectives, priorities, hopes and dreams of Massachusetts employers:

  1. Develop the best system in the world for educating and training workers with the skills needed to allow companies to succeed in a rapidly changing global economy.
  2. Support business formation and expansion by creating a uniformly competitive economic structure, a structure that must include a reliable transportation system.
  3. Establish a world-class regulatory system that ensures the health and welfare of society in a manner that meets the highest standards of efficiency, predictability, transparency and responsiveness.
  4. Moderate the immense long-term burden that health care and energy costs place on business growth.

Those objectives inform the position of Massachusetts employers on a host of issues you will confront upon taking office, from encouraging fair agreements on international trade to creating a balanced National Labor Relations Board to correcting problems with federal health-care reform that threaten the economic survival of small companies here in the commonwealth.

Most immediately, the employers who create prosperity in Massachusetts eagerly anticipate your efforts to accomplish the “urgent task of rebuilding our nation and renewing the American dream.” 

Congratulations again.

Topics: Elections, Massachusetts economy, Donald Trump

Subscribe to our blog

Browse by Tag