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More Substance, Fewer Stunts in Education Debate

Posted by John Regan on Aug 7, 2019 8:30:00 AM

A so-called “beach party” set up outside the State House last week by education funding advocates was a disrespectful and frivolous stunt carried out by people who should instead be focused on the well-being and economic futures of Massachusetts schoolchildren. 

BeachPartyThe point of the beach party, complete with beach balls and shaved ice with flavors such as “accountability slime lime,” was to excoriate the Legislature for going on summer recess without passing a massive restructuring of the funding formula for public schools. 

The fiscal 2020 budget Governor Charlie Baker signed last week includes a $268 million increase in state assistance for K-12 education, but activists want a multi-year commitment to ramp up education spending and address gaps in the quality of education from one community to another.

The beach party was the latest in a series of questionable antics perpetrated by the Massachusetts Education Justice Alliance and allies who want billions of dollars in additional education spending with no accountability for results.

In May, Massachusetts Teachers Association President Merrie Najimy posted a photo to Facebook of herself and three other women smiling and clutching fake pearl necklaces with a caption that read, "Alice Peisch, let go of the wealth and #FundOurFuture."

Rep. Alice Peisch, Co-Chair of the Joint Committee on Education, often wears pearls and the prop suggested that she could not understand the circumstances of poorer students because she lives in the wealthy suburb of Wellesley.

Members of the teachers union have also been observed at public meetings carrying blank checks to signal their distaste for any measurements to accompany additional spending.

The 3,500 member companies of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) who depend upon the public schools to prepare the workforce of the future support education reform that contains specific and measurable performance objectives. Anyone who owns or manages a business tracks return on investment and the investment we make in our public schools and students should be no different. 

The stakes in the debate are enormous, beginning with an estimated price tag in the neighborhood of $1 billion. The governor and the Massachusetts Legislature deserve credit for proceeding cautiously on education reform.

AIM members who wish to be updated about the education reform debate may contact Katie Holahan, Vice President of Government Affairs. 

Topics: Education Reform, Education, Workforce Training

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