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Baker: Hydro Power Key to Stabilizing Price of Electricity

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jul 9, 2015 1:04:00 PM

Legislation filed today by the Baker administration to increase purchases of hydroelectric power from Canada takes a constructive first step toward stabilizing the price of electricity and helping the commonwealth meet impending deadlines to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

HydroThe measure would require Massachusetts electricity distribution companies to seek competitive proposals and sign long-term contracts – potentially in partnership with other New England states – for 1,200 to 2,400 megawatts of hydro power from sources that would likely include Hydro-Quebec and other Canadian producers.

State officials say hydro power will stabilize electricity rates by providing cost-effective, clean base load generation that would ensure system reliability in the face of an anticipated loss of as much as 8,500 megawatts of regional electric generation capacity by 2020. Hydro power, these officials maintain, can be dispatched around the clock while solar generation produces electricity only13 percent to 14 percent of the time.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts, which has been working to reduce some of the highest electric rates in the nation, is reviewing the Baker hydro proposal.

“The 4,500 member employers of Associated Industries of Massachusetts support any proposal for renewable or low carbon power that is competitively bid and results in real energy price relief for consumers,” said Robert Rio, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs for AIM.

“We intend to work with the Legislature and the administration to verify that clear and rigorous review standards are contained in Governor Baker’s bill so any result may be judged objectively against alternatives consistent with good economic principles.”

The Baker bill would allow utilities to enter into contracts lasting 15 to 25 years with hydro producers. It would also allow companies to seek proposals for electric transmission infrastructure to interconnect load centers in the New England control area with regions or areas where clean energy generation resources may be available. And it would not preclude intermittent renewable energy resources, such as wind, from participating in the solicitation provided the renewable resources is supported by hydropower.

The Global Warming Solutions Act requires Massachusetts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020. The Act anticipated that part of that reduction would be accomplished through the purchase of 1,200 megawatts of electricity generated by hydro producers.

Officials say the legislation is necessary to allow Massachusetts to move forward on a regional basis with Connecticut, Rhode Island and other states that already have the authority to forge long-term deals for hydro power. Baker met with other New England governors in April and emphasized an “all-option approach” on energy that calls for importing hydroelectricity from Canada and expanding the region’s natural gas capacity.

“This legislation is critical to reducing our carbon footprint, meeting the goals of the Global Warming Solutions Act and protecting ratepayers already stuck by sky high energy prices,” Baker said.

“Increasing the flow of hydroelectric power into Massachusetts and New England diversifies our energy portfolio and makes it clear we are ready to collaborate with our neighboring states to secure cost-effective, carbon-reducing energy solutions for the region.”

 

Topics: Energy, Charlie Baker

Small Business Gets a Breather on Health Insurance

Posted by Katie Holahan on Jun 17, 2015 11:11:00 AM

Small businesses in Massachusetts won some breathing room yesterday from a provision of federal health care reform that threatens to raise insurance premiums for some companies by more than 50 percent.

health_careThe U.S. Department of Health and Human Services granted Massachusetts a waiver that will allow the commonwealth an additional year to use existing health-insurance rating factors that are otherwise prohibited under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Massachusetts has for many years used 11 rating factors in its merged individual and small-business health insurance market, but federal health reform is phasing that number down to four.

Among the factors to be eliminated in pricing health insurance for companies with fewer than 50 employees are industry, participation rate, group size, intermediary discount and group purchasing cooperatives.

The waiver extends the commonwealth’s current transition period first granted in 2013 and extended in 2014, allowing small-group market insurers to continue using two-thirds of current ratings factors through January 1, 2017, after which the ratings factors will be reduced to one third, before being phased out entirely on January 1, 2018.

The postponement came in response to a May 27 request from Governor Charlie Baker to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Silvia Matthews Burwell. The federal government did not respond to a second request by the governor to postpone a separate requirement that Massachusetts expand its small-group health-insurance market next year from companies with 1-50 employees to those with 1-100 employees.

“Protecting small businesses from massive insurance rate hikes is essential to making sure job creators continue to thrive here and I am grateful the Obama administration granted Massachusetts this flexibility,” Baker said.

A study by health insurance companies indicates that the rating changes could raise or lower rates for small companies by up to 57 percent.

The biggest fluctuation in terms of cost will stem from the change in the size factor. Currently, larger businesses benefit from the size factor, with smaller businesses paying more; so when that factor is limited, the larger businesses will see an increase in cost. Elimination of the wellness program participation factor is also expected increase relative premiums for groups with healthier populations.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts strongly supports Baker’s efforts to maintain portions of the successful 2006 Massachusetts health-care reform.

“The Baker Administration deserves tremendous credit for aggressively seeking a waiver to help small businesses in Massachusetts,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

“But delay does not equal resolution.  Massachusetts needs a permanent waiver from the rating-factor changes of federal reform because it’s wrong to penalize employers in the one state that led the nation on health-care reform.” 

Massachusetts insured a majority of its residents under healthcare reform in 2006, establishing a state marketplace that merged small group and individual insurance markets. The ratings factors served as a protection for small employers who took on risks from the individual insurance market.

Topics: Health Care Reform, Health Care Costs, Charlie Baker

Governor Baker - Why We Need Regulatory Reform

Posted by Christopher Geehern on May 26, 2015 9:02:26 AM

Editor's Note - Governor Charles D. Baker delivered the following remarks about regulatory reform to the AIM Annual Meeting on May 8.

I also want to talk a little bit about what we're doing with respect to regulatory reform. I look at regulatory reform as sort of the equivalent of cleaning out your basement. It's something you probably ought to do every couple of years whether you want to do it or not.

Baker.2015The organizations that complained to me the most about the Commonwealth's regulatory structure over the course of the campaign, were cities and towns. By far.

Now there are 351 cities and towns in Massachusetts, and 250 of them have less than 20,000 people. We're basically a conglomeration of a lot of small towns and a few mid-sized cities and then one big one, Boston.

Those communities have all the same issues in dealing with regulatory complexity that you would expect that small and mid-sized businesses would have. Or small and mid-sized non-profits. Or small and mid-sized educational institutions.

Regulatory reform in some respects, from my point of view, is about providing the clarity and simplicity, and in some cases, the modernization of the way the state engages in regulatory activity to create a framework so that the small can play in the same playing field as the large.

For larger businesses, complex regulatory environments are a problem. For small and mid-sized organizations, in many cases, they're the difference between thriving and barely or maybe not at all getting by. And that's why this initiative, to me, is so important.

It's also important because it forces the Commonwealth, and this is a good thing, to have to have a conversation with the people it regulates, about what it does and how it does it, and how it might be able to do it better.

And anybody who doesn't think that's a valuable exercise needs to think really hard about how they go about managing their own enterprise and their own organization. This is about introspection as much as anything else. And it's about time.

Topics: AIM Annual Meeting, Charlie Baker, Regulatory Reform

Governor Baker Addresses AIM Annual Meeting

Posted by Christopher Geehern on May 17, 2015 8:10:21 PM

Governor Charles D. Baker discussed economic growth, regulatory reform, overhauling the T and other issues during a keynote speech May 8 to the AIM Centennial Annual Meeting.

Topics: AIM Annual Meeting, Charlie Baker, Regulatory Reform

Governor: Economic Growth Builds Great State

Posted by Christopher Geehern on May 8, 2015 2:55:00 PM

Governor Charles D. Baker inaugurated the centennial celebration of Associated Industries of Massachusetts today by telling more than 900 business leaders that economic growth “is always going to be the foundation of a great state.”

Baker2014“Without expansion, it becomes very hard to accomplish much with our good works agenda,” Baker said during a keynote address at AIM’s 100th Annual Meeting in Boston.

The governor said that his administration and the Legislature are making significant progress on a number of key issues, including balancing the state budget, regulatory reform and the MBTA.

Resolving an unexpected $765 million structural budget shortfall for the current fiscal year and a $1.8 billion deficit for Fiscal Year 2016 will permit state officials to develop strategic financial plans moving forward, according to Baker.

“It gives you the ability to think strategically about what to do with your resources,” he told the crowd.

On regulatory reform, the governor said it has been the 351 cities and towns of Massachusetts that have been the strongest voices for creating an efficient and modern system of regulations. Small and medium-sized towns, along with small and medium-sized businesses, Baker said, are the entities that will benefit most from reform.

The idea is “to create framework so the small can play on same playing field as the large. For small and mid-sized organizations, it is the difference between thriving and barely getting by or not getting by.”

Baker said every Massachusetts employer and resident has a stake in overhauling the MBTA since more than half of the revenue for the transit system comes from people who do not ride it. He also implored business leaders to involve themselves in solving the opiate crisis, which last year took more lives in Massachusetts than automobile accidents.

The governor noted that AIM has done well to survive and prosper in the rough-and-tumble world of Massachusetts politics.

“You should be enormously proud of the work that AIM has done for a century on behalf of businesses in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,” Baker said.

Topics: AIM Annual Meeting, Charlie Baker, Regulatory Reform

Governor Seeks to Head Off Premium Shock from Federal Health Reform

Posted by Katie Holahan on May 1, 2015 11:17:18 AM

Governor Charlie Baker is seeking to preserve several key elements of the Massachusetts health-insurance market rather than implement provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that could raise premiums for some small Bay State employers by more than 50 percent.

health_careThe governor, in a letter Monday to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Matthews Burwell, asks the federal government to postpone the requirement that Massachusetts expand its small-group health-insurance market next year from companies with 1-50 employees to those with 1-100 employees.

Baker also seeks permission for Massachusetts to use its current group of rating factors to price health insurance for small businesses. The commonwealth has for many years used 11 rating factors in its merged individual and small-business health insurance market, but federal health reform is phasing that number down to four.

The governor says in his letter to Burwell that “there continues to be significant concern about the impact the ACA market rules will have on the Massachusetts market.”

“Decreased use of the rating factors has already led to significant premium swings that have disproportionately affected small businesses,” Baker writes.

“The eventual elimination of the rating factors, as well as the restriction limiting insurers to file their rates on an annual basis, will lead to further disruption and instability in the marketplace.”

Former Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius rejected a request from then-Governor Deval Patrick in September 2013 for a waiver from the same provisions of federal health reform. Rejection of the waiver came despite last-minute letters of support to Sebelius from U.S. Representatives Michael Capuano, Stephen Lynch and William Keating.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts strongly supports Baker’s request to maintain portions of the successful 2006 Massachusetts health-care reform.

“Imposition of new definitions of the small-group market and elimination of rating factors introduces needless uncertainty into the market for health insurance. Why disrupt a system that works here in Massachusetts where 97 percent of people have health insurance?” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

Massachusetts has begun a four-year transition period under which the value of the rating factors that will eventually disappear slowly decreases:

  • For plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2014 but before January 1, 2016:  Two-thirds of the level of the value of the disallowed factors may be used;
  • For plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2016 but before January 1, 2017: One-third of the level of the value of the disallowed factors may be used;
  • For plan years beginning on or after January 1, 2017, issuers must be in full compliance with federal rating rules.

The decrease in (and eventual elimination of) certain rating factors could result in premium rate changes for certain groups. The biggest fluctuation in terms of cost will stem from the change in the size factor. Currently, larger businesses benefit from the size factor, with smaller businesses paying more; so when that factor is limited, the larger businesses will see an increase in cost.

Elimination of the wellness program participation factor is also expected increase relative premiums for groups with healthier populations.

Topics: Health Care Reform, Health Care Costs, Charlie Baker

Governors Address $7.5B Energy Question

Posted by Robert Rio on Apr 27, 2015 8:44:53 AM

$7.5 billion.

That’s the amount of money Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy says has been added to the electric bills of New England employers and homeowners during the past two years because of natural-gas pipeline constraints.

ElectriclinessmallEmployers should therefore be encouraged that five New England governors, including Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, met in Hartford last Thursday and pledged to work together to help consumers who pay more for electricity than almost anywhere else in the United States. While the costs and political challenges of investments in natural gas pipelines, transmission wires and renewable energy remain formidable, the governors nevertheless acknowledged that solving the energy crisis “is greater than any one state can solve alone.”

“We recognize that each state may support addressing our regional energy challenge in different ways. These efforts must be done in partnership with state legislatures, and respecting the requirements of laws, regulatory proceedings, and opportunities for public participation that are unique to each individual state,” the governors said in a statement.

“Together and respecting the bounds of individual state laws, we plan to continue to work to seek out economically beneficial infrastructure solutions to New England’s power system challenges. We are committed to working as a region to advance New England’s shared economic, energy, and environmental goals.”

The statement was consistent with the recommendations that AIM and statewide business organizations in Connecticut, New Hampshire and Maine made to the governors in an April 1 letter noting that regional and federal policies have boosted New England’s reliance on natural gas to generate electricity from 15 percent to more than 50 percent.

“Until now, our associations worried about lost job growth and economic activity as … enterprises expanded operations elsewhere. Given the current energy crisis, we now face a bleaker scenario: employers moving existing jobs out of New England to lower-cost locations around the country or world,” the business associations said.

“Lack of urgent leadership by New England’s governors may well lead to higher unemployment and a lagging economy for years to come.”

Average electric rates in Massachusetts are the third highest in the nation for industrial ratepayers, and more than twice as high as companies pay in the competitor state of North Carolina. Those costs place employers at a significant disadvantage when competing with businesses located in other areas of the country.

AIM has long maintained that any solution to the region’s energy problem must be fair to ratepayers, market based and implemented without subsidies that force one group of customers to pay the freight for others. The association has opposed programs like Cape Wind that gouge ratepayers without providing meaningful benefits. 

In addition to communicating with the New England governors, AIM currently sits on a commission to bring the commonwealth’s solar energy program into line with other states that install solar for less than half the price of what Massachusetts consumers pay. The association also represents employers on the Energy Efficiency Advisory Council, which oversees nearly $1 billion in annual spending for energy efficiency.

AIM and its 4,500 member employers urge the New England governors to continue their discussions and to solve one of the key burdens facing the regional economy.

AIM has recently established an Employer Energy Interest Group. If you would like to be on this group and receive regular updates, please email me at rrio@aimnet.org.

Topics: Electricity, Energy, Charlie Baker

Why Do Activists Fear Regulatory Reform?

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Apr 21, 2015 7:32:38 AM

The tantrum being staged by some environmental activists over Governor Charlie Baker’s regulatory reform initiative makes us wonder what scares these groups about an objective review of the commonwealth’s regulatory structure.

paperwork.crop.smallBaker signed an executive order on March 31 initiating a comprehensive review process for all regulations enforced by the Executive branch and leaving in place the regulatory moratorium announced by the administration earlier this year. The order requires state agencies to ensure that existing regulations are clear and concise and that any newly proposed regulations are measured for their potential impact on businesses of all sizes.

Hardly a radical proposition. Indeed, AIM and its 4,500 member employers maintain in the association’s Blueprint for the Next Century economic plan that Massachusetts must “establish a world-class state regulatory system that ensures the health and welfare of society in a manner that meets the highest standards for efficiency, predictability, transparency and responsiveness.”

But not everyone is happy about reform.

“An executive order by Governor Charlie Baker has set off alarms among environmentalists, consumer activists, and union leaders, who fear it will dismantle some of Massachusetts’ strict regulations governing the state’s water and air quality standards, worker safety requirements, and health regulations,” screamed an April 12 article in The Boston Globe.

The hopelessly biased article quotes George Bachrach, president of the Environmental League of Massachusetts, as warning that “There is great concern across the board” in the education, public health, labor, business, and environmental fields.

But the Globe wasn’t done. It published a second article on Friday in which it called AIM “one of the state’s leading antiregulatory groups” and suggested that Secretary of Administration and Finance Kristen Lepore, a former Vice President at AIM, somehow appropriated regulatory reform language from the AIM Blueprint.

It’s curious that the environmental community reflexively mischaracterizes an initiative supported by virtually every Massachusetts employer to ensure an efficient, coherent and consistent regulatory system worthy of the Bay State’s status as an economic leader. It’s a reminder that inefficient regulatory structures create their own bureaucracies of apologists who benefit more from perpetuation of the status quo than from making the regulations work well for everyone.

Let’s set the record straight:

  • Massachusetts employers acknowledge the need for effective and well-managed regulation that ensures the health and welfare of society - without weakening the financial underpinnings of the job market. Our Blueprint offers several innovative proposals for “smart partnerships” to ensure that government-business interactions solve problems instead of propping up bureaucracies. One such example came from State Senator Daniel Wolf from the Cape and Islands, founder of Cape Air in Hyannis, who some years ago worked with state environmental officials to capture runoff from the washing of planes at Barnstable Municipal Airport.
  • Kristen Lepore did not author the Blueprint – I did. (Perhaps the environmental folks mistook Kristen for Chris.) But I did not write the Blueprint alone. The plan is based on detailed conversations and meetings with more than 1,000 hard-working Massachusetts employers, from corner grocery stores to software startups, who took time last fall to offer their best ideas to improve the commonwealth’s economy. One small employer summarized the need for regulatory reform this way: “A small employer does not have the staff, resources or time to figure out the multiple layers of regulation.  There are way too many minefields that can trip up or stall a small business.  This is an opportunity cost that is never discussed and cannot be measured.  How much time is wasted worrying about or dealing with regulation that is well intentioned, but is rarely thought through to its consequence?
  • AIM unequivocally applauds the Baker Administration for including in its executive order the provision that state regulations not exceed federal requirements or duplicate local requirements. The recent fiasco involving state hoisting regulations issued despite a pre-emption in federal law illustrates the potential waste of time and money created when state policymakers trying to one-up the federal government. We agree with David I. Begelfer, chief executive of the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties, Massachusetts, who told the Globe: “There is a good question to ask: Why do we have higher standards than the federal government? … It’s not enough to say more stringent is better.”

Governor Baker’s regulatory reform is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to foster long-term economic growth by taking a clear-eyed look at regulations that are outdated, redundant, ineffective, inefficient or unnecessary.

So what are the environmental activists so afraid of?

Topics: Charlie Baker

Governor Initiates Regulatory Overhaul; Which Rules Would You Change?

Posted by John Regan on Mar 31, 2015 2:09:00 PM

Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) will support the Baker Administration’s newly announced regulatory reform initiative by collecting information from Bay State employers about regulations that needlessly impede economic growth.

Baker2014AIM President Richard C. Lord said the association has established a Web page that allows employers to report regulations that are inefficient, ineffective or outdated. The association will forward all of the information it receives to state officials as they conducts their yearlong regulatory review.

“The 4,500 employer members of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) unequivocally support regulatory reform. One of the key objectives of AIM’s long-term economic plan, the Blueprint for the Next Century, is for Massachusetts to develop a world-class state regulatory system that ensures the welfare of society in a manner that meets the highest standards for efficiency and predictability,” Lord said 

“AIM has collected a rich library of evidence over the years from employers about regulations that work and those that do not. We expect to add to that body of information and share it with the administration and the Legislature as we work together to make the vision of effective regulation a reality.”

Governor Charles D. Baker signed an executive order today initiating a comprehensive review process for all regulations enforced by the Executive branch and leaving in place the regulatory moratorium announced by the administration earlier this year. The order requires state agencies to ensure that existing regulations are clear and concise and that any newly proposed regulations are measured for their potential impact on businesses of all sizes.

The administration will encourage public input on proposed regulations. Business and competitiveness impact statements will be made available on the commonwealth’s Web site.

Baker identified regulatory reform as an economic priority during a speech to the AIM Executive Forum last November.

“This will be an intensive process that ultimately makes Massachusetts a more efficient and competitive place to live and work, while driving economic growth,” the governor said in a statement today.

Added Secretary of Administration and Finance Kristen Lepoere: “We will ensure that all regulations administered by the Executive Department benefit the Commonwealth without undue burdens or costs and serve a legitimate purpose in making Massachusetts a safe, healthy, and effective place to do business.”

AIM’s Blueprint for the Next Century offers several suggestions for improving the state regulatory environment:

  • The governor should appoint an independent ombudsperson to review comments, suggestions and complaints from employers about ineffective state regulations and/or the manner in which those regulations are enforced. The ombudsperson would have the authority to determine which regulations and/or enforcement issues represent real impediments to growth and recommend changes to the Legislature or the executive branch.
  • Encourage regulators and employers to adopt “smart partnerships” to ensure that government-business interactions solve problems instead of propping up bureaucracies.
  • Engage willing employers who are global leaders in productivity and process improvement to streamline the operation of state government agencies. General Electric, an AIM member, provided just such a service for the New York State Highway Department at the request of Governor Andrew Cuomo. GE Capital used its expertise in lean process to help the Highway Department reduce the processing time for curb-cut requests from 70 days to three days.

Please contact Brad MacDougall, Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM, bmacdougall@aimnet.org, with questions or comments.

Topics: Business Regulation, Regulation, Charlie Baker

Budget Proposal Targets 'Unsustainable' Spending Growth

Posted by Brad MacDougall on Mar 4, 2015 3:40:55 PM

What does the proposed state budget filed today by Governor Charlie Baker mean for Massachusetts employers?

Baker2014The bottom line is pretty simple – state spending is growing at twice the rate of tax revenue and that trend is unsustainable. The new administration must therefore make difficult choices to close a projected $1.5 billion budget shortfall for next fiscal year just weeks after addressing an unexpected $750 million gap in the current budget.

It's something that that the CEO of almost every member company of Associated Industries of Massachusetts has had to do at one time or another.

Secretary of Administration and Finance Kristen Lepore said the administration will not raise taxes or fees, nor tap the state’s rainy day fund, meant for fiscal emergencies. At the same time, the allocation of scarce budget resources provides an insight into the new governor’s long-term priorities, from having state employees pay an increased share of their health insurance premiums to increased aid to cities and towns.

“For two consecutive years, our spending growth has outpaced our revenue growth. After over $1 billion in budgetary reductions last year, state spending still grew at 7.8% more than the year before, while tax revenue only grew at 4%. This is simply an unsustainable path for Massachusetts - we must live within our means,” the governor said in his budget message.

“This proposal keeps spending growth around 3%, and allows us to begin to address long-term structural changes and reduce our reliance on one-time revenue. We protect our rainy day fund, because in a largely healthy economy it is clear our issues are based on a need to prioritize spending and make state government more efficient. We also avoid layoffs through an early retirement package that will reduce the size and cost of the state workforce.”

Fiscal discipline and predictability are welcome themes for Massachusetts employers who, according to the Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, pay approximately $150 million more in taxes each year than they did a decade ago. CEOs expect the government to conduct its financial affairs in the same responsible manner as the corner grocery store, the young biotechnology company or millions of citizens managing the household budget.

“The 4,500 member companies of Associated Industries of Massachusetts typically pay more attention to the budget as a proxy for the ability of state government to manage its affairs, rather than to individual line items,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

“The governor’s proposed budget takes constructive steps toward ensuring that the commonwealth lives within its means.”

The projected shortfall for Fiscal Year 2016 is driven by two factors, according to the Taxpayers Foundation.

The first is a significant increase in costs for items and programs considered nondiscretionary — such as Medicaid, the state-federal health program for poor and disabled people, and pensions — just to keep the same level of service next year. The second is the state’s heavy reliance on one-time sources of money — pots of cash that are tough or impossible to tap again — this fiscal year.

Those sources of money total about $1 billion and include tax settlements with corporations, a temporary diversion of tax revenue intended for the state’s rainy day fund, and casino licensing fees.

Here are the key elements of the Baker budget proposal:

  • A $34 million increase, or 3.6%, in unrestricted local aid to $980 million
  • A $105.3 million increase in Chapter 70 funding, which increases funding for all 321 school districts
  • A phase in of the Earned Income Tax Credit to 30% of the federal limit while phasing out the Film Tax Credit
  • Funding local aid by 75% of revenue growth, a 3.6% increase
  • Increasing transportation spending by 20%, including $187 million, or a 53% increase, in direct aid to the MBTA
  • An early retirement incentive program to responsibly reduce the state’s administrative spending 

Topics: Budget, Taxes, Charlie Baker

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