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Budget Assumes EMAC Assessment Will End in December

Posted by Katie Holahan on Jul 25, 2019 12:01:35 PM

Sometimes the real value of legislation is found in the things left out of a bill.

StateHouse-resized-600Such was the case this week as the Massachusetts Legislature passed a $43.1 billion budget for the fiscal year that began July 1. The spending blueprint included important elements ranging from curbs on the cost of prescription drugs in the state Medicaid program to increased aid for public schools.

But the most significant part of the budget for employers lies in what was left out – an extension of the onerous two-year assessment on Massachusetts businesses to fund a budget shortfall in the MassHealth insurance program for low-income people.

The Legislature passed  an increase to the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (EMAC) in 2017.  Employers have already paid tens of millions of dollars more than anticipated under the levy, some $519 million by the time the assessment sunsets at the end of this year instead of the $400 million envisioned under the legislation.

AIM in January called for an immediate end to the so-called EMAC assessment. The association also engaged a diverse coalition of organizations ranging from human services providers to home-care aides and trade associations to urge key legislators not to extend the two-year assessment in the Fiscal Year 2020 budget.

Employers are gratified that the Legislature is sticking to the original plan to sunset the tax at the end of 2019.

The assessment falls most heavily upon companies in which employees elect to use MassHealth rather than the employer-sponsored health plan. The assessment has increased EMAC from $51 to $77 per employee, while employers are also required to pay up to $750 for each worker who receives public health benefits.

AIM member employers are proud to lead the nation in providing health care coverage to their employees. Sixty-five percent of Bay State companies offer health insurance coverage to their workers, compared with 56 percent of employers nationwide. A full 100 percent of Massachusetts employers with 200 or more employees offer coverage. 

Employers stand ready to work with policymakers to make long-term structural reforms to both the MassHealth program and the commercial insurance markets to make the financing of health care for all Massachusetts residents sustainable.

Topics: Massachusetts state budget, Health Care, Employer Health Assessment

AIM, Coalition Ask Legislature to Limit MassHealth Assessment

Posted by Katie Holahan on Apr 8, 2019 3:34:04 PM

A diverse coalition of organizations ranging from AIM to groups representing human services providers and home-care aides urged key legislators today not to extend the two-year assessment imposed on employers last year to close a financial gap at the state’s MassHealth insurance program.

State House 2015In a letter to House Ways and Means Committee Chair Aaron M. Michlewitz and Vice Chair Denise C. Garlick, the coalition says that  the “burden of the (Employer Medical Assistance Contribution) EMAC Supplement falls particularly on certain industries, especially small employers with lower wage workers, many of whom are paid via state contracts.”

“This unbudgeted and unanticipated expense is threatening employers’ ability to make critically needed investments in our workforce and to maintain vital programs that support vulnerable members of our communities.”

The Ways and Means Committee is currently developing the state budget for the fiscal year that begins on July 1.

AIM has already urged the Legislature to end the EMAC assessment immediately because employers last year paid tens of millions of dollars more than anticipated under the levy. Businesses are on track to contribute some $519 million by the time the assessment sunsets at the end of this year instead of the $400 million envisioned under the 2017 legislation.

At the same time, enrollment in MassHealth has fallen as the Baker Administration has initiated steps to ensure that only people eligible for benefits receive them. 

The Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) recently indicated that, in calendar year 2017, total MassHealth spending decreased by 0.2 percent, driven in part by a 2.4 percent decrease in enrollment. The trend indicates relief from the pressures of enrollment increases that have plagued the MassHealth program in recent years and produced the fiscal deficit that resulted in the EMAC Supplement policy.

“The conditions that led to the imposition of the surcharge no longer exist. Employers who have paid hundreds of millions of dollars in assessments believe it is fair to look at ending the surcharge in year two,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

The next round of EMAC supplement billings will be delivered to employers in the next week.

The members of the coalition include BAMSI (Brockton Area Multi-Services, Inc.), Building Trades Employers’ Association, Home Care Aide Council, MAB Community Services, Massachusetts Staffing Association, New England MCA/MSCA, Providers’ Council, The ERISA Industry Committee, Italian Home for Children, Massachusetts Senior Care Association, the Nashoba Valley Chamber of Commerce and the Springfield Chamber of Commerce.

The coalition said the EMAC supplement has raised costs for Massachusetts nursing facilities alone by more than $16 million.

“As a Commonwealth, we face a renewed imperative to lower the cost of health insurance for everyone in Massachusetts via long-term, efficient strategies. Short-term, unpredictable financial obligations like the EMAC Supplement tax serve only to deter business expansion and employee recruitment, and to reduce our ability to provide vital services,” the group wrote.

The Legislature passed the assessment in July 2017 minus a set of structural reforms proposed by Governor Baker to place the MassHealth/Medicaid program on a firm financial footing. The surcharge raised the EMAC assessment from $51 to $77 per employee. Employers also were required to pay up to $750 for each worker who receives public health benefits.

Employers may request a waiver from the fees if they prove a hardship. Of 246 such waiver requests, administration officials said they have allowed 99.

Topics: Massachusetts House of Representatives, Employer Health Assessment, EMAC Surcharge

AIM Calls for End to MassHealth Employer Assessment

Posted by Rick Lord on Jan 2, 2019 8:57:01 AM

Associated Industries of Massachusetts and its 4,000 member companies today called upon the Legislature and Governor Charlie Baker to end to the two-year assessment imposed on employers last year to close a financial gap at the state’s MassHealth insurance program for low-income residents.

health_careAIM believes the assessment is no longer necessary because employers last year paid tens of millions of dollars more than anticipated under the levy. Businesses are on track to contribute some $519 million by the time the assessment sunsets at the end of this year instead of the $400 million envisioned under the 2017 legislation.

At the same time, enrollment in MassHealth has fallen as the Baker Administration has initiated steps to ensure that only people eligible for benefits receive them. And state tax collections have exceeded targets over the past several months, putting the state on firmer financial footing.

“The conditions that led to the imposition of the surcharge no longer exist. Employers who have paid hundreds of millions of dollars in assessments believe it is fair to look at ending the surcharge in year two,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

The Legislature passed the assessment in July 2017 minus a set of structural reforms proposed by Governor Baker to place the MassHealth/Medicaid program on a firm financial footing. The assessment fell most heavily upon companies in which employees elect to use MassHealth rather than the employer-sponsored health plan.

The Boston Globe: Employer group balks at fees to prop up MassHealth

An existing assessment called the employer medical assistance contribution (EMAC) increased from $51 to $77 per employee. Employers also were required to pay up to $750 for each worker who receives public health benefits.

Employers may request a waiver from the fees if they prove a hardship. Of 246 such waiver requests, administration officials said they have allowed 99.

Governor Baker originally proposed a $2,000-per-employee assessment upon companies at which at least 80 percent of full-time worker equivalents did not take the company’s offer of health insurance, and that did not make a minimum contribution of $4,950 annual contribution for each full-time worker. That proposal encountered significant opposition from the business community.

AIM member employers are proud to lead the nation in providing health care coverage to their employees. Sixty-five percent of Bay State companies offer health insurance coverage to their workers, compared with 56 percent of employers nationwide. A full 100 percent of Massachusetts employers with 200 or more employees offer coverage. 

Employers stand ready to work with policymakers to make long-term structural reforms to both the MassHealth program and the commercial insurance markets to make the financing of health care for Massachusetts residents sustainable.

“Eleven years ago, employers joined with doctors, hospitals, patient advocates and lawmakers to forge a health-reform law that required all parties to share the responsibility for improving access to health care. The employer community calls for that same sense of shared responsibility now to solve the MassHealth shortfall,” Regan said.

Please contact Katie Holahan, Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM, keh@aimnet.org, for updates on this issue.

Topics: Massachusetts Legislature, Health Care, Charlie Baker, Employer Health Assessment

Employer Confidence Up Slightly in April

Posted by Christopher Geehern on May 8, 2018 8:48:02 AM

Business confidence strengthened during April as growing optimism among employers about the prospects of their own companies outweighed a more cautious outlook about the state and national economies.

BCI.April.2018The Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose 0.7 points to 64.2 last month after falling a full point in March. The BCI has gained four points during the past 12 months and remains well within the optimistic range.

The April increase was driven by 2.6-point surge in the index measuring employer confidence in their own companies, along with a 2.5 percent jump in the Employment Index.

Those increases offset slippage in employer views of both the Massachusetts and US economies. The trend appears to be tied to specific issues such as imposition of the employer health-care surcharge in Massachusetts and commodity price increases stemming from the Trump administration’s tariffs on steel and aluminum.

“While business is good, I am not confident in the general direction and tax policies of the federal government. My impression is that short term gains will come at the expense of future economic, social, and environmental stability,” wrote one employer.

Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design, said the confidence numbers reflect a solid economy that is growing modestly – 1.6 percent annually on the state level and 2.3 percent annually for the United States.

“The Massachusetts economy is operating at virtually full capacity, but growth is slowing due to constraints on labor,” said Torto.

“Employers are certainly concerned about public policy issues, but those concerns for the moment are minimized by the underlying strength of their businesses.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index provided a study in contrasts during April.

The Massachusetts Index assessing business conditions within the commonwealth declined 2.8 points to 64.1, leaving it 0.8 points higher than in April 2017.

The U.S. Index ended the month at 63.9, down 1.3 points after rising 6.7 points during the previous 12 months. April marked the 98th consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy, though the gap has recently narrowed.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, gained 2.5 points to 65.1. The Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, declined 1.1 points to 63.3. The Current Index has risen 5.2 points and the Future Index 2.8 points since April 2017.

Operational Views

Employer views of their own companies were far brighter.

The Company Index increased to 64.3, up 4.1 points for 12 months. The Employment Index ended the month at 59.8, a 3.6-point increase for the year.

Manufacturing companies (65.3) remained more optimistic than non-manufacturers (61.1). Large employers (66.1) were more bullish than medium-sized (63.4) or small businesses (63.4).

“Massachusetts employers have maintained a positive view of the economy since the fall of 2013. The numbers move up and down in a small range, and there are certainly long-term concerns about labor availability, but business confidence remains comfortably in positive range amid a full-employment economy,” said Sara L. Johnson, Executive Director, Global Economics, IHS Markit and a BEA member.

Competitive Playing Field

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also BEA member, pointed to the recent announcement by Philips Lighting that it will end manufacturing at its Fall River plant as evidence that Massachusetts must still pay attention to the cost of doing business.

“Many of the employers who responded to the April Business Confidence Index Survey expressed concern about the new $200 million health-care surcharge and its effect on small business,” Lord said.

“The surcharge was levied to close a budget deficit in the MassHealth program for low-income residents. AIM continues to work with the Legislature to institute structural reforms that will put that program on sound financial footing for the long term.” 

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Employer Health Assessment

State Issues Regulations on Employer Health Assessment

Posted by Katie Holahan on Nov 6, 2017 4:08:53 PM

The Baker Administration today released draft regulations for the new employer health assessment designed to close a budget shortfall in the state's MassHealth program.

Read the Draft Regulations

The regulations, published by the Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance (DUA), explain details of how the new Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (EMAC) supplement will be administered. The EMAC supplement is a new wage tax, levied on employers who have certain workers enrolled in either the MassHealth program or subsidized Health Connector coverage. 

  1. Employers with six or more employees will access their estimated liability for the EMAC supplement quarterly, via their DUA online account when they provide their quarterly wage filing;
  2. Detailed information will be provided as to the number of their employees on MassHealth or subsidized Connector coverage;
  3. Employers have 10 days from receipt of this information to appeal their determination of liability to the DUA.

The draft regulationsare available for public review and response. The Department will hold five listening sessions, across the state, to allow employers and interested parties to provide in-person feedback:

  • Boston | November 13 | 1-3 pm | Hurley Building
  • Springfield | November 14 | 10 am - nooon | Department of Industrial Accidents office
  • Worcester | November 15 | 2-4 pm | Department of Industrial Accidents office
  • Lawrence | November 16 | 10 am - noon | Department of Transitional Assistance.

A fifth session will be scheduled on Cape Cod.

Questions and suggestions may also be shared with the Department electronically.

 

Topics: Controlling Health Care Costs, Employer Health Assessment

Governor to Sign Employer Assessment

Posted by Katie Holahan on Aug 2, 2017 7:43:35 AM

Governor Charlie Baker said last night that he intends to sign legislation imposing a $200 million MassHealth assessment on employers. The governor also reaffirmed his commiment to work with lawmakers to make long-term structural reforms to the state’s health-insurance program for low-income people.

“While this is certainly not the outcome we hoped for, we recognize that the governor’s decision is carefully considered and designed to achieve the ultimate, long-term goal of substantive MassHealth reform,” said Rick Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Industries of Massachusetts.

“We are encouraged by the repeated statements of commitment by both Senate and House leadership that reform of the MassHealth system is as high a priority for them as it is for the employer community.

“In 2006, employers joined with doctors, hospitals, patient advocates, and lawmakers to forge a health-reform law that required everyone to share the responsibility for improving access to health care. Right now, employers are faced with a policy levying a new tax on businesses without any corresponding cost-efficiencies implemented in the public health-care system. We anticipate a continued dialogue as we work to affect meaningful, sustainable, long-term MassHealth reform.

“We are willing – in fact, we must – join together once again with a renewed focus to ensure the commitments of the employer community are not made in vain,” Lord said.

Topics: Massachusetts state budget, Health Care Costs, Employer Health Assessment

Legislature Levies Medicaid Assessment Minus Reforms

Posted by Katie Holahan on Jul 26, 2017 4:53:35 PM

The Massachusetts Legislature today levied a $200 million tax on employers to cover a shortfall in the MassHealth program without making long-term structural changes needed to solve the problem.

StateHouse-resized-600.pngThe House of Representatives and Senate took the action despite pleas yesterday from the Baker Administration and the business community to consider the assessment and the long-term reforms as a package. AIM believes the financial problems at MassHealth, which provides health insurance to 1.9 million residents, will become more severe without significant reforms.

The assessment would increase the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (EMAC) and fall most heavily on companies where employees use MassHealth instead of an employer health plan. The assessment would be partially offset by a two-year Unemployment Insurance rate adjustment that would save employers $335 million over two years versus current rates.

“The 4,000 employer members of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) are deeply disappointed that the Legislature has again decided to impose an assessment on employers without reforming the MassHealth program and reining in the crippling cost of health insurance,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

“We note that the Legislature has pledged to pursue MassHealth reforms at a later date. We look forward to working with them on those reforms.”

The Legislature initially passed the reform-free assessment on July 7 as part of the budget for Fiscal Year 2018. Governor Charlie Baker returned that section of the budget to the Legislature 10 days later and asked lawmakers to pass the full package of reforms designed to place MassHealth on a firm financial footing.

The proposed reforms include:

  • Restructuring MassHealth coverage for non-disabled adults to look like commercial insurance coverage;
  • Moving 140,000 people with incomes more than the federal poverty level out of MassHealth and into ConnectorCare;
  • Shifting 230,000 MassHealth members from standard MassHealth coverage, which includes coverage for long-term care, into CarePlus, which does not;
  • Requiring the commonwealth to petition the federal government to re-establish the prohibition against employees who are offered employer-sponsored insurance from seeking coverage through MassHealth.

It is uncertain whether the governor will sign the newest version of the assessment.

“Employers are thus left not only to struggle with the rising cost of providing health insurance to their own employees, but to bail out an unsustainable public insurance program as well,” Regan said.

Topics: Massachusetts Legislature, Health Insurance, Employer Health Assessment

AIM Calls for Long-Term Cost Changes to MassHealth

Posted by Rick Lord on Jul 25, 2017 2:19:20 PM

Editor's note - Associated Industries of Massachusetts President Richard C. Lord submitted the following testimony today to the Legislature's Joint Committee on Ways & Means and Joint Committee on Health Care Financing urging lawmakers to approve long-term structural changes to the state Medicaid program. AIM's Katie Holahan (above) delivered the same message in testimony before the committees.

On behalf of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) and its 4,000 employer-members statewide, thank you for your continued engagement with the employer community on the difficult issues before you today. We are pleased that both committees have so promptly scheduled this hearing and the second hearing scheduled for this afternoon. 

AIM supports the language contained in Governor Baker’s amendment to the Fiscal Year 2018 budget, returned to you within Attachment F.  The amendment contains a complex agreement that was developed after months of intensive negotiations between the Baker Administration and the business community. We believe the comprehensive plan moderates the proposed employer assessment by coupling it with meaningful structural reforms to the public health insurance system and rate relief within the Unemployment Insurance system.   

It is vital to maintain all aspects of this package so we will not find ourselves addressing an even larger MassHealth budget deficit in two years than the one we confront today. 

AIM likewise supports language authorizing the Baker Administration to seek a federal waiver allowing Massachusetts to return to policies implemented within the 2006 Health Care Reform law, and to expand the scope of practice for certain health-care providers to facilitate lower-cost care. 

The 2006 reform law made employees who were offered employer-sponsored health insurance ineligible for MassHealth.  The intent was to balance the requirement that employers do their “fair share” in offering health insurance with concerns about the financial burden on the MassHealth system.  The Affordable Care Act (ACA) reversed that policy and allowed income-eligible employees to decline employer coverage and seek insurance through MassHealth.  

The change created a migration of newly-eligible individuals from their employer-sponsored insurance to MassHealth, substantially increasing the commonwealth’s financial burden.  The ACA made public health insurance an economically rational choice for eligible residents in a state known for its expensive health-care system.   

As MassHealth enrollment grows, the commonwealth experiences the reality that employers have faced for years: the high cost of health-care coverage in this state threatens the underpinnings of our economy.  Policymakers who have concentrated almost exclusively on access and coverage now face a renewed imperative to lower the cost of health insurance for everyone in Massachusetts. 

AIM member employers are proud to lead the nation in providing health care coverage to their employees. Sixty-five percent of Bay State companies offer health insurance coverage to their workers, compared with 56 percent of employers nationwide. A full 100 percent of Massachusetts employers with 200 or more employees offer coverage.1 

The 4,000 member employers of AIM provide health insurance to the majority of residents in the commonwealth. 

But providing that coverage has financial consequences. 

According to the most recent data available from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMMS), Massachusetts was the second highest-spending state for health care in 2014, 30 percent more than the national average. Personal health-care spending in Massachusetts, per capita, has increased more than 12 percent in five years – from $9,417 in 2009 to $10,559 in 2014. Cost growth like this is unsustainable and has accelerated in the face of attempts by both employers and the commonwealth to contain it. 

Businesses, in fact, have almost nothing to show in the way of cost savings and efficiencies five years after Massachusetts’ major push toward health care cost containment. 

The commonwealth has exceeded the 3.6 percent health spending growth benchmark in two of the past three measurement periods. Total Health Care Expenditures (THCE) grew by 4.2 percent from 2013 to 2014, and by 4.1 percent from 2014 to 2015. 2 

These cost increases are occurring in an industry in which experts agree that at least a third of all care is unnecessary – delivered in the wrong setting; marked by a lack of coordination; provided with an inadequate emphasis on prevention; harmed by medical errors; burdened with rules and fraud; or just plain excessive.  

Now, the employer assessment means that business is expected to shoulder the escalating costs of the public healthcare system, as well.  More importantly, they are being asked to close the MassHealth deficit absent any of the  long-term structural reforms needed to solve the underlying financial problems with the program. 

Eleven years ago, employers joined with doctors, hospitals, patient advocates and lawmakers to forge a health-reform law that required all parties to share the responsibility for improving access to health care. The employer community calls for that same sense of shared responsibility now to solve the MassHealth shortfall. 

Thank you for considering AIM’s views and please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or need any further information.  

Topics: Massachusetts state budget, Controlling Health Care Costs, Employer Health Assessment

Governor Sends Back Employer Assessment; Seeks MassHealth Reforms

Posted by Katie Holahan on Jul 17, 2017 3:38:18 PM

Governor Charles D. Baker returned to the Legislature today the employer health-care assessment portion of the Fiscal Year 2018 budget, along with provisions changing Unemployment Insurance rates for 2018 and 2019, and urged legislators to include long-term reforms that will put the MassHealth program on a firm financial footing.

Health.Energy.jpgThe governor is also filing separate legislation making reforms to the commercial health-insurance market.

“The governor’s actions provide the Legislature with the opportunity to review and vet the reforms, and to pass a thoughtful, comprehensive package that balances investments made by all stakeholders in the Massachusetts healthcare system,” said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Industries of Massachusetts.

The employer assessment would raise $200 million annually through the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (EMAC) and fall most heavily on companies where employees use MassHealth instead of an employer health plan. The assessment would be offset by a two-year Unemployment Insurance rate adjustment that would save employers $335 million over two years versus current rates.

The administration hammered out the MassHealth reforms during months of negotiations with AIM and other members of the business community. The proposed reforms include:

  • Restructuring MassHealth coverage for non-disabled adults to look like commercial insurance coverage;
  • Moving 140,000 people with income above 100% of the federal poverty level out of MassHealth and into ConnectorCare;
  • Shifting 230,000 MassHealth members from standard MassHealth coverage, which includes coverage for long-term care, into CarePlus, which does not;
  • Requiring the commonwealth to petition the federal government to re-establish the prohibition against employees who are offered employer-sponsored insurance from seeking coverage through MassHealth.

The Baker Administration’s decision to file stand-alone legislation addressing commercial health insurance reforms acknowledges the need for comprehensive reform of our private healthcare systems. As employers are faced with the second most expensive health-care costs in the nation, the need for reform and cost containment is vital to maintain both the quality of care and the level of coverage across our commonwealth.

AIM looks forward to the Legislature’s consideration of these challenging topics and their willingness to engage with a broad coalition of partners across our health-care system to attain an equitable resolution.

Topics: Massachusetts state budget, Controlling Health Care Costs, Employer Health Assessment

AIM to Governor: Send Employer Health Assessment Back to Legislature

Posted by Rick Lord on Jul 12, 2017 3:11:18 PM

Editor's note - AIM delivered the following letter from CEO Richard C. Lord to Governor Charles D. Baker this afternoon.

Dear Governor Baker:

On behalf of the 4,000 employers of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM), we strongly urge you to send back to the Legislature the employer health-care assessment provisions contained in the Fiscal Year 2018 (FY18) budget, along with a recommended amendment that includes the reforms agreed to by AIM, your administration and other interested parties.

The FY18 budget now on your desk would require employers to cover the $200 million financial shortfall in the MassHealth program while omitting the long-term structural reforms essential to addressing health-care cost imbalances in both the commercial and public insurance markets.

The result is that employers – who already struggle with the rising cost of providing health insurance to their employees – will also be forced to assume the responsibility for funding an unsustainable MassHealth program.

The assessment comes at a time when Massachusetts employers have almost nothing to show in the way of cost savings and efficiencies four years after the state’s cost-containment law took effect.  In the three years that the state has been measuring the year-over-year growth in health care expenditures, we have exceeded the cost control benchmark twice.

Massachusetts employers are proud to lead the nation in providing health care coverage to employees. Sixty-five percent of Bay State companies offer health insurance coverage compared with 56 percent of employers nationwide. A full 100 percent of Massachusetts employers with 200 or more employees offer coverage.

In 2006, employers joined with doctors, hospitals, patient advocates, and lawmakers to forge a health-reform law that required everyone to share the responsibility for improving access to health care.  We ask you to insist that same sense of shared responsibility be applied now to solve the MassHealth shortfall by returning the employer-assessment provisions to the General Court and insisting that the comprehensive compromise forged by the business community and your administration be included in the final budget. 

Thank you for considering AIM’s position.  Should you have any questions please feel free to contact me directly at 617-262-1180.

Sincerely,

 Lord_Richard C.jpg

Richard C. Lord, President & CEO
Associated Industries of Massachusetts

Topics: Budget, Employer Health Assessment, health insur

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