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Twelve Companies Honored with 2018 AIM Next Century Awards

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Sep 4, 2018 8:30:00 AM

NextCentury2018

A world-renowned wellness resort in the Berkshires, a Southbridge manufacturer that has made cutlery since James Monroe was president, and a clean-technology incubator that has launched more than 170 companies are among 12 organizations and individuals that will receive Next Century awards from Associated Industries of Massachusetts at a series of regional celebrations in September, October and November.

Next Century awards honor employers, community organizations and individuals who have made unique contributions to the Massachusetts economy and the well-being of the people who live here.

AIM announced today that 2018 Next Century awards will go to Greentown Labs of Somerville; Cityscapes of Boston; 99 Degrees Custom of Lawrence; Gem Group Inc. of Lawrence; Lancaster Packaging of Hudson; Dexter Russell Inc. of Southbridge; Six Flags New England of Agawam; United Personnel of Springfield; Canyon Rach of Lenox; B & B Micro Manufacturing of North Adams; Accurounds of Avon; and Sensata Technologies of Attleboro.

“AIM created the Next Century Award to honor the accomplishments of companies and individuals creating a new era of economic opportunity for the people of Massachusetts. These remarkable people and institutions - world leaders in their fields – inspire the rest of us by exemplifying the intelligence, hard work and dedication to success that has built our commonwealth,” said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIM.

Award winners will be honored at AIM regional celebrations in Boston on September 27, Lawrence on October 4, Worcester on October 11, Holyoke on October 18, Pittsfield on October 25, and Easton on November 1. Each event will run from 4:30-6:30 and is free to AIM members.

Here are summaries of each recipient, along with the date and location of the celebration when each will receive the award.

Greentown Labs | September 27 | 100 High Street Amenity Center | Boston

Somerville-based Greentown Labs is the largest hardware-focused, cleantech incubator in the country, providing 100,000 square feet of prototyping lab and office space to entrepreneurs building products to address society’s biggest environmental challenges.

Greentown Labs was born in 2011 when five entrepreneurs - Jason Hanna of Coincident, Sam White and Sorin Grama of Promethean Power Systems, Jeremy Pitts of Oscomp Systems and Adam Rein of Altaeros Energies - were looking for affordable space to keep building prototypes after they graduated from MIT. The organization has since nurtured more than 170 startup companies that have together created 1,200 jobs and raised more than $350 million in funding.

The organization currently houses 90 companies that are building and commercializing solutions for renewable-power generation, sustainable transportation, energy efficiency, battery storage, industrial- waste recycling, and water conservation. In late 2017, Greentown Labs expanded its campus within the Union Square neighborhood of Somerville and added 58,000 square feet of coworking, prototyping lab, chemistry lab, and event space.

Among the companies to grow out of Greentown are Bevi, Accion Systems, NBD Nano, RightHand Robotics, Open Water Power, and Piaggio Fast Forward. 

Greentown Labs also maintains a Manufacturing Initiative that allows startups to establish working relationships with manufacturers throughout the commonwealth. The Manufacturing Initiative has facilitated nearly 800 connections between startups and manufacturers leading to more than 75 contracts.

Cityscapes| September 27 | 100 High Street Amenity Center | Boston

“I transform people’s lives with the power of plants.”

Janice Goodman, founder and CEO of the interior-scape company Cityscapes, has built a thriving business by bringing the outdoors inside at glass-and-steel office structures throughout Boston.

Forget the single plant in the corner of your office – Goodman and her 70 employees believe the business is about biophilia, the concept developed by Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson identifying the innate human and emotional connection to nature. Cityscapes has made that connection everywhere from the Wintergarden at the Prudential Center to the renovated atrium at 100 Federal Street, where the company installed two “living walls” of plants.

Cityscapes blossomed in 1992 from a retail flower business called Fleurtacious that Goodman operated in Copley Square. Cityscapes provides design consultation, weekly guaranteed plant maintenance, flowering plant programs, seasonal displays and exterior landscape services for property management companies, office buildings, corporations and hotels throughout the greater Boston area.

Cityscapes uses live plants in areas where nature is sparse. Goodman says the process is especially important today amid a worldwide building boom of office towers.

“Traditionally, with urban expansion, many natural open spaces are lost, but designing with nature in mind will benefit us all in the end,” she says.

“Today’s built environments can and quite often do cause stress. Biophilic design is a solution to this issue, decreasing negative effects on people and nature alike, while facilitating the connection between the two.”

Goodman is a professional speaker and registered instructor for the American Institute of Architects Continuing Education system; and for BOMI, Building Owners Managers Institute, offering educational credits and programs to architectural and commercial property professionals.

Cityscapes is heavily invested in supporting community organizations. The company donates plant material and holiday decorations to local charities and non-profit organizations such as the Brookview House, Friends of the Elderly, The Home for Little Wanderers, The Pine Street Inn, The American Cancer Society, Hope in Bloom, Rosie’s Place, and the Veterans Hospitals throughout Boston.

Goodman and her staff also invite children from local day-care centers to the greenhouse, so they can learn about plants and how they help the environment.  Cityscapes has provided jobs for people with disabilities for more than 18 years.

99 Degrees Custom | October 4 | The Riverwalk, Lawrence

“Apparel, meet your future.”

99 Degrees Custom of Lawrence is seeking to create nothing less than a second industrial revolution in a city that was a cradle of the first.

The company launched in 2013 with a vision of melding technology, design, just-in-time manufacturing and socially conscious management into a new model for the apparel industry. Thirty-four-year-old founder and CEO Brenna Nan Schneider calls her vision “inclusive innovation.”

99 Degrees Custom fills specialty orders for activewear – everything from oven mitts to running jackets.   Applications include military, medical, and consumer markets. The company offers full development services, sample making, small-batch manufacturing, and production.

Customers include start-ups and established brands like New Balance. Schneider has grown by helping apparel companies complement their forecast-based global supply chain with demand-driven domestic production. That allows the companies to keep inventory in stock, reduce mark-downs, and eliminate sold out styles, colors, and sizes.

“By combining a smart and responsive supply chain model with wearable technology integration, we envision a bright future for US apparel manufacturing and jobs,” the company says.

99 Degrees Custom is known for lean process, a team committed to continuous improvement, and production lines engineered for agility. It works “on the cutting edge of sew-free and wearable technology integration as well as on-demand and mass customization manufacturing.”

Schneider’s long-term plan is to become a major apparel manufacturer with 1,000 jobs that allow employees to support themselves and their families.

“You have families working fulltime jobs living in poverty and more jobs that are being created that place people in poverty,” says Schneider.  “So how do we change that?”

Schneider starts by paying her workers above the minimum wage.   She has also created a culture in which learning is a priority.   Speed and quality are important, but what she wants most from her employees is to continuously learn – technical skills and executive ones, like solving problems.

99 Degrees Custom has garnered numerous awards, including the 2017 Massachusetts Legislative Caucus Manufacturing Award, the MIT Inclusive Innovation Prize and The Boston Globe’s Game Changers list.

The Gem Group | October 4 | The Riverwalk | Lawrence

Lawrence-based Gem Group - the promotional product industry's premier supplier of bags, business accessories, gifts and writing instruments – celebrated its 60th anniversary this year by expanding into a new line of business that will create significant economic growth in its home town.

The company in January announced its expansion into the specialty foods category under the brand name, Gourmet Expressions. It will offer a range of gourmet gifts bundled with an assortment of totes, coolers and drinkware, as well as a collection of gourmet food gift towers and baskets.

According to Gem, the new food-gifting division will offer customers one-stop shopping convenience for year-round gifting and branded marketing solutions.

“This was an easy choice for us,” said Jonathan Isaacson, president of the Gem Group and son of founder Samuel Isaacson.

“There hasn’t been that much innovation in the food category, and it’s a place where we believe we can add a lot of value. For example, in the traditional food business, there often isn’t a keepsake to remind the recipient of where that gift came from. With our design-oriented bags and cases, we can solve that problem.”

Gem Group is currently in the process of building out a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) certified fulfillment center within its manufacturing plant in Lawrence. HACCP is a management system in which food safety is addressed through the analysis and control of biological, chemical and physical hazards from raw material production, procurement and handling, to manufacturing, distribution and consumption of the finished product.

Such dramatic growth is nothing new at Gem Group, which employs approximately 350 people in Lawrence and 500 people worldwide. The company operates a manufacturing operation in China but has maintained most of its production in Massachusetts despite the changing economics of manufacturing in a high-cost state.

The company is ranked as one of the industry's largest suppliers by the Advertising Specialty Institute (ASI).

Gem maintains a full in-house design team and generates multiple product launches a year. The product line includes totes, coolers, backpacks, padfolios, duffels, electronics and gadgets, drinkware, stationery, messenger bags, briefcases, gifts, travel bags and writing instruments, as well as high-quality brands featuring American Tourister, bobble, Brookstone, Igloo, Lynktec, Moleskine, Samsonite, Speck, Thermos and Zebra.

Samuel Isaacson founded the Gem Group before passing it on to his son in 1994. Under Jonathan Isaacson’s ownership, the company moved to Lawrence, and expanded its facilities from 90,000 square feet to 155,000 square feet. 

Dexter-Russell Inc.| October 11 | Mechanics Hall | Worcester

The oldest and largest maker of professional cutlery in the United States celebrates 200 years in business in 2018, an extraordinary accomplishment that underscores the adaptability and foresight of manufacturers who continue to thrive in Massachusetts.

Dexter-Russell Inc. employs more than 200 people at its plant in Southbridge just west of Worcester. The company manufacturers about 2,400 different products, from steak knives to pizza cutters, many of which end up in restaurants or meat and seafood processing plants. Many New England fisherman prefer a Dexter knife to cut their stripers, fluke or tuna.

Efficiency and automation are the reasons that the company has been able to prosper during a period when many manufacturers have not, according to President and CEO Alan Peppel, a longtime member of the AIM Board of Directors.

“We have always believed in continuous improvement, and now are overlaying more aggressive lean manufacturing concepts. In addition, we have always reinvested back into the business using the most advanced machinery in the world to make our products world class in quality and efficiency,” Peppel says.

Dexter-Russell, Inc. is successor to two venerable American cutlery manufacturers: The Harrington Cutlery Company and the John Russell Cutlery Company.

Henry Harrington, a New England craftsman and inventor, established the first cutlery company in the United States on June 18, 1818 in Southbridge. Harrington manufactured surgical equipment and shoe knives.

He introduced the Dexter trade name in 1884. Named after Henry Harrington’s son, the Dexter line of fine kitchen and table cutlery soon gained a reputation for quality in America's homes and restaurants.

Another New Englander, John Russell, founded his Green River Works on March 1, 1834. After having made his fortune in the cotton industry, Russell, at age 37, turned his energies to the manufacturing of quality cutlery. He built his water powered factory on the banks of the Green River near Greenfield.

On May 1, 1933, the Harrington Cutlery Company and the John Russell Cutlery Company merged, bringing together the two most respected names in cutlery. The new company, Russell Harrington Cutlery Company, offered a broad range of quality cutlery products from the famous knives that "won the west" to innovative cutlery for the professional and industrial markets.

After an ownership change in 1968, the company changed its name to Dexter-Russell, Inc. in 2001 to reflect its long history of product brand identity.

Just as John Russell paid generous wages in the nineteenth century to attract skilled craftsmen from Europe, Dexter-Russell today competes for talent with pay and benefits such as a profit-sharing plan that is available to all employees. It was one of the first profit-sharing plans created in the country at the time.

The program gives workers the opportunity to contribute up to 5 percent percent of their earnings into their 401-K retirement fund each year. When combined with the company’s match and separate contribution based on profitability, an employee can save 20 percent of earnings annually into their own retirement account. More than 90 percent of employees participate.

Another element of the company’s success and longevity, according to Peppel, is its practice of being close to the customer and listening to customer needs. The company is often able to identify a need, then engineer and manufacture a knife, turner, or other product and have it delivered in less time than it would take to make and ship the product from overseas.

“Our success is evaluated every day: how well do we meet our customers’ needs; and as a manufacturer, how well do we improve our products and our manufacturing processes to improve quality and efficiency,” Peppel says.

Lancaster Packaging | October 11 | Mechanics Hall | Worcester

Marianne Lancaster has built the Hudson-based supply management and wholesale packaging distribution firm she started straight out of college 29 years ago into a national company with 18 employees operating out of two buildings.

It’s a small-business success story forged against challenges ranging from the 2008 recession to competition from large national players to the unique financial and operational issues that confront minority women business owners. She has persevered not only by growing her own company but also by becoming a respected voice helping fellow minority entrepreneurs access the resources they need.

Lancaster Packaging can source industrial packaging, often with military specifications, from multiple suppliers with which it has built relationships over the years. The company also keeps a supply of packaging in its Hudson warehouse to help clients who need it quickly. Certain sizes and types of packaging built to military specs can take time to order from a custom shop - having it available in Lancaster's warehouse allows a quick drop shipment.

Faced with increasing competition in the packaging space from logistics and trucking companies, and after losing her biggest customer in 2005 (a bank that was bought out by a larger bank), Lancaster was forced to reinvent her business model.

She launched a procurement services division in 2008 that focused her services on unique items companies purchase once but likely won't again. That allows procurement managers to focus on their core purchasing, while outsourcing smaller bits to Lancaster.

"This is stuff that comes up that's unexpected that they may never buy from that supplier again," she told the Worcester Business Journal. "(Procurement managers) don't want to deal with a $20 flashlight someone needs in Alabama. That's what we do."

The bulk of her customers are in the aerospace industry, including BAE Systems and Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. Engineering teams are often the ones purchasing one-off items.

Lancaster credits the procurement division with most of the company's revenue growth over the past few years. It’s the sort of growth that lands Lancaster Packaging regularly among the Boston Globe’s Top 100 women-led companies.

Lancaster has used her own business success to address the broader issues facing women and people of color seeking to build companies. In 2013, she testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, which held a hearing on how to strengthen the entrepreneurial ecosystem for minority women.

Lancaster told the committee that lack of financing initially inhibited the development of her company, a story consistent with studies showing that minority-owned firms have a disproportionate challenge in accessing capital. According to a study by the U.S. Department of Commerce, minority-owned firms are less likely to receive loans, more likely to be denied loans, and pay higher-than-average interest rates.

Ultimately, according to Lancaster, success is built upon relationships.

“The key to our success has been the development of amazing, trusting and collaborative relationships between both our customers and suppliers.”

Six Flags New England | October 18 | Wistariahurst Museum | Holyoke

The economic footprint of Six Flags New England is every bit as imposing as the Superman roller coaster that marks the largest amusement park in New England along the banks of the Connecticut River.

Six Flags, which began to operate the former Riverside Park in 1998, has spent millions of dollars over two decades to expand its lineup of 100 rides, shows and attractions, along with the largest water park in the Northeast. The company is the region’s largest seasonal employer, hiring more than 3,000 people each year during a nine-month season that stretches from the spring through the summer to the holidays.

The 235-acre park is also a lynchpin of the tourism economy both for western Massachusetts and the entire commonwealth. The organization’s 13 roller coasters draw thousands of visitors to the region and provide national media exposure for Massachusetts as a destination.

The property is one of 20 across the United States, Canada and Mexico operated by Six Flags, a $1.4 billion-a-year enterprise that is the nation’s largest owner of regional amusement parks. More than 30 million people visit a Six Flags park each year.

Capital investments at Six Flags during the past six years include vertigo-inducing rides such as Harley Quinn Spinsanity, the Joker 4D Free Fly Coaster, Wicked Cyclone and New England Sky Screamer. In between the thrills, Six Flags welcomes visitors with entertainment figures ranging from Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck to Batman and Wonder Woman.

Six Flags maintains a similarly high profile in the western Massachusetts community.  The company supports more than 3,000 non-profit organizations ranging from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and the American Red Cross to the March of Dimes and Baystate Children’s Hospital in Springfield. The support includes cash donations, ticket donations and on-site charity events.

United Personnel | October 18 | Wistariahurst Museum | Holyoke

At a time when finding qualified employees remains a defining challenge for Massachusetts companies, United Personnel of Springfield connects more than 700 people each day to good jobs throughout Massachusetts and Connecticut.

It’s been that way for 35 years since Mary Ellen Scott and her late husband, Jay Canavan, started the company with the goal providing employment opportunities to match the skills and aspirations of a range of western Massachusetts residents.  The company has thrived during the intervening decades by deftly weaving itself into the fabric of a western Massachusetts economy that operates uniquely on personal contact and trust.

United Personnel and its staff of 40 people provide clients with everything from temporary and contract workers to direct-hire employees in areas ranging from administrative and professional to information technology, light manufacturing, medical, dental and hospitality. The business puts the company on the front lines of complex and rapidly changing employment issues such as diversity, work-force development and education to meet ever-changing skill demands and the need to bring new participants into the work force.

Headquartered in downtown Springfield, United Personnel offers staffing support services throughout Massachusetts and Connecticut. The company operates additional offices in Northampton, Pittsfield and Chelmsford, along with Hartford and New Haven, Connecticut.

United Personnel is now led by Tricia Canavan, Mary Ellen and Jay’s daughter, along with a committed team of managers and staff. Canavan serves as a member of the Associated Industries of Massachusetts Board of Directors, in addition to serving on the boards of the Economic Development Council of Western Massachusetts, the Springfield Public Forum, the Springfield Regional Chamber of Commerce, Springfield Business Leaders for Education and the Massachusetts Workforce Development Board.

The company regularly appears on the Boston Globe list of Top 100 Women-Led Business in Massachusetts and this year received Inavero Best of Staffing awards for both client satisfaction and talent satisfaction.

"With a tight labor market and growing economy, finding the right recruiting partners is critical to success," said Inavero CEO Eric Gregg. "Best of Staffing winners provide consistently remarkable service to their clients and job candidates, and I couldn't be prouder to feature United Personnel as true leader in the industry."

The company underscored its ties to the Pioneer Valley two years ago when it opened new offices in Springfield in the historic Stearns Building, which dates to 1912. The offices face a corner of Steiger Park, once the site of the Steiger’s Department Store, and are across Bridge Street from the Springfield Innovation Center at 270-280 Bridge Street

The company marked its new headquarters and ongoing commitment to work-force development and education by creating a scholarship fund in the company's name that will help deserving students from the Gateway Cities of the Pioneer Valley continue their educations. The fund will be administered by the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts.

Canyon Ranch Lenox | October 25 | Hotel on North | Pittsfield

Canyon Ranch Lenox, which rose from the ruins of the 19th-century Bellefontaine Mansion in 1989, has firmly established itself -and the Berkshires - as one of the top wellness destinations in the world.

It has also established itself as a centerpiece of the Berkshire County economy, attracting nearly 45,000 guests annually and employing about 560 people.

The resort encompasses nearly 120 acres, with the historic, stately 1897 Bellefontaine as the centerpiece. The structure was once as a private home, a seminary and a boarding school, but was empty and gutted by fire when Canyon Ranch Founders Mel and Enid Zuckerman and Jerry Cohen spent $10 million to restore the building as the East Coast presence of the company they started in Tucson, Arizona in 1979.

Canyon Ranch offers a lengthy selection of treatments that range from deep tissue massage to Ayurvedic treatments and detoxifying seaweed wraps. Board certified physicians are on staff to provide evidence-based prevention, science-based precision, and high-touch personalization as part of integrative medical solutions. The facility also offers diagnostic laboratory testing.

The Lenox resort is part of a sprawling wellness enterprise that includes the original flagship in Tucson, the world’s largest day spa at The Venetian® & The Palazzo® hotels in Las Vegas, and 22 Canyon Ranch at Sea wellness facilities on Cunard Cruise Line, Oceania® Cruises, Regent Seven Seas Cruises®, and Celebrity Cruises®. The company is now owned by John Goff, Chairman of Canyon Ranch, and is headquartered in Ft. Worth, Texas. Helmed by former auto executive Susan Docherty as its chief executive, Canyon Ranch is committed to the Lenox property and has recently accelerated its investments there.

Two years ago, the brand embarked upon a multi-million-dollar renovation of its dining room and guest rooms. The company also constructed 19 luxury condominiums called the Residences at Bellefontaine, providing owners a world-class wellness at their doorstep. The residential project is valued at $20 million to $22 million and contributes around $300,000 a year in property taxes to the Town of Lenox.

It’s a project that fits into a global “wellness real estate” market estimated at $134 billion by the Global Wellness Institute, with a pipeline of more than 740 projects worldwide.

Docherty told The Berkshire Eagle last year: "Canyon Ranch is a very wise sanctuary. We're trying to impart wisdom in whatever way guests seek it, so they can have a transformative experience."

B&B Micro Manufacturing | October 25 | Hotel on North | Pittsfield

Tiny houses are making a big impact on the Berkshire County economy.

B&B Micro Manufacturing – founded in 2016 by Hoosac Valley High classmates Chris St. Cyr, Mitch Bresett and Jason Koperniak – now employs 42 people in the Windsor Mill in North Adams making the kind of tiny houses that have become a staple of Home & Garden Television. B&B makes mostly contracted units for a vacation rental company, but also does custom tiny houses and its own designs.

North Adams Mayor Richard Alcombright told iBerkshires recently that the company's growth has been a bright spot in reviving the city's manufacturing base, an integral part of its creative economy. 

"You can say that there's going to be 100 new jobs when a hotel is being built and people here will say, 'OK'," he said. "Now you have 42 on the payroll since April in manufacturing and that, here, strikes a very cool chord."

Tiny homes, usually 500 or fewer square feet and capable of being moved on a trailer, have become enormously popular during the past decade among individuals and families looking to save money, simplify their lives and adopt an environmentally sustainable life. The market has been buoyed by television shows and tony home villages sprouting up around the country.

Tiny houses cost between $30,000 and $75,000 and can be built quickly. All units are built to Recreational Vehicle Industry Association standards.

St. Cyr, Bresett and Koperniak all grew up in Adams but came to the business from different directions. St. Cyr graduated from Williams College and worked for a hedge fund; Koperniak graduated from Bowdoin College and worked in the financial sector; and Bresett learned the home-building trade from his father, who founded B&B as a traditional home-building business. 

The B&B Micro Manufacturing partners see the next step as creating modular units for families or small custom homes. These could be an affordable housing solution for young people or empty-nesters, especially in expensive housing markets like eastern Massachusetts.  The company is newly certified as a modular manufacturer in the state of Massachusetts.  

"If we can take a $70,000 unit and put in the Boston area on a tract of land that may not support a large home — east of 495, housing is an issue," Koperniak told iBerkshires.

"We're trying to be that architecturally chic niche where you can have something very nice in a small size, at an affordable price point, and relatively fast."

Sensata Technologies | November 1 | Easton Country Club | Easton

The name Sensata comes from the Latin word sensate, which means “those gifted with sense.” It’s an appropriate name for century-old, $3.5 billion global company that engineers critical sensing systems embedded within automobiles, heavy vehicles and off road equipment, industrial and telecommunications equipment, and commercial and military airplanes.

Sensata designs and manufactures sensing, electrical protection, control and power management systems with operations and business centers in 12 countries globally.  The company’s products improve safety, efficiency, emissions and comfort for millions of people every day in transportation, appliance, aircraft, and industrial applications.

“We focus on solving the world’s need for a cleaner, more efficient, electrified and connected world,” says CEO Martha Sullivan, a member of the AIM Board of Directors.

With a US base in Attleboro, Sensata employs more than 1,000 people in Massachusetts.

A key priority remains developing and attracting engineering talent in a competitive global marketplace.

“We have a compelling vision and purpose and technologies that are vital to changes underway in the industrial landscape. This attracts talent and has served us well,” Sullivan says.

“Retaining our talent is just as important as attracting them,” Sullivan says. “We have built a culture that is based on a set of core values that helps define who we are as an organization; these values are built on teamwork and interdependency – we call it One Sensata – they are built on integrity, striving for excellence, bringing passion to the solutions and systems that we create and offering flexibility to our teams. This is how we are winning for our customers and for our teams.”

Winning for Sensata means being a world leader and early innovator in mission-critical sensor-rich solutions and electrical protection, helping engineers accomplish tasks as varied as:

  • Enabling electrification in cars, trucks and industrial equipment;
  • Lowering  emissions;
  • Improving industrial equipment efficiency;
  • Preventing electrical fires; and
  • Enabling smart and connected products.

The company sells 47,000 unique products and ships more than 1.1 billion units annually. Much of its market growth has come in China, which now represents 15 percent of company revenues.

AccuRounds | November 1 | Easton Country Club | Easton

AccuRounds and its CEO, Michael Tamasi, have become symbols of the new generation of hyper-efficient, advanced manufacturing companies driving the Massachusetts economy.

Founded in 1976, Avon-based AccuRounds is a contract manufacturer that machines and assembles precision turned components for the medical, defense, aerospace, semiconductor, robotics and emerging-technology markets. The company makes everything from the metal shafts used in the flu-vaccine manufacturing process to the top spires on all the "Freedom Trail" signs in Boston.

The company employs 80 people in its 45,000-square-foot facility on Bodwell Street.

AccuRounds was a manufacturing pioneer in 1995 when it embarked on a quest to implement lean manufacturing. These techniques were applied throughout the organization, and in 2006, AccuRounds won the Shingo Prize Northeast Silver Medallion, the first contract metalworking company in North America to do so.

The company later reorganized into value streams utilizing a comprehensive lean management system that has dramatically increased speed to market. It is a pattern that traces the transformation of manufacturing in Massachusetts from high-volume commodity goods made on vast assembly lines to complex, engineered parts made by highly-skilled workers.

Recently, AccuRounds has introduced automation, robotics, machine monitoring, big data and 3D printing to its production floor.  These new technologies are the future of manufacturing.  The team has embraced them as part of their continuous-learning culture.

CEO Tamasi has become an evangelist for the value of manufacturing in creating economic opportunity for the people of Massachusetts. He currently co-chairs the Massachusetts Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative, a state initiative to enhance the competitiveness of Massachusetts Manufacturers, and also chairs Business Leaders United, a group led by the National Skills Coalition in Washington, DC.

Tamasi went to the White House four years ago as one of only two small-business CEOs to participate in a high-level conference with former President Barack Obama on dealing with long-term unemployment. He has spent significant time addressing the persistent shortage of skilled manufacturing workers that threatens to slow the growth of the state economy.

“There is a renaissance in manufacturing taking place in this country. We have a golden opportunity to capitalize on it and grow our economy, but we need people to be trained and skilled,” he told Fox News after the White House conference.

“We need critical thinkers and problem solvers. We need people who want to improve, and most importantly, we need people with a positive attitude.”

Topics: Massachusetts economy, Massachusetts employers, AIM Next Century Award

Employers Begin 2018 on Confident Note

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Feb 6, 2018 8:06:35 AM

Massachusetts employers began 2018 much the way they ended 2017 – with growing confidence in the economy and optimism about their own business prospects.

BCI.January.2018.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose half a point to 64.1 during January, setting another 17-year high. The BCI has gained 2.7 points during the past 12 months as employer confidence levels have remained comfortably within the optimistic range.

Growing enthusiasm about the Massachusetts economy and a brightening outlook on economic conditions six months from now fueled the January confidence increase. At the same time, the hiring outlook remained muted as low unemployment and demographic shifts continued to impede the ability of employers to find the workers they need.

The survey was taken prior to major declines in global financial markets during the past several days.

“Rising confidence is not surprising in a state with 3.5 percent unemployment and an economy that grew at a 3.3 percent annual rate during the fourth quarter,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“Economic output, job growth and spending all rose at a healthy clip in Massachusetts during the final three months of the year and economists expect modest growth to continue during the first half of 2018.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators  

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index were mixed during January.

The most significant gain came in the Massachusetts Index assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, which rose 1.3 points to 68.9. The Massachusetts Index has gained 3.7 points in the past two months, 5.5 points year over year and now stands at its highest level since November 2000.

The U.S. Index of national business conditions also continued a yearlong rally by gaining 0.6 points to 64.8. January marked the 95th consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, decreased a point to 61.7 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, surged 2.1 points to 66.6. The Current Index has risen 2.1 points and the Future Index 3.3 points during the past 12 months.

Operational Views

The Company Index, reflecting employer views of their own operations and prospects, rose slightly, gaining 0.2 points to 62.3. The Employment Index was essentially flat, leaving it 2.1 points below its level of January 2017.

Non-manufacturing companies (66.6) were more optimistic than manufacturers (62.3). Large employers (67.2) were more bullish than medium-sized (62.7) or small businesses (63.5).

“The strong Future Index readings signal that employers anticipate steady growth during the first two quarters of 2018. The only fly in ointment remains the prospect that labor shortages may constrict the ability of companies to grow and expand,” said Paul Bolger, President, Massachusetts Capital Resource Company and a BEA member.

Political Risks

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also BEA member, said 2018 brings with it significant risk for employers as progressive groups push ballot questions that could create a $1 billion paid family and medical leave program, impose a punitive tax on many small businesses and raise the state minimum wage to $15 per hour.

“The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court will today hear arguments in a challenge that I and four other business leaders filed to the constitutionality of the income surtax question. Meanwhile, the business community is seeking common ground on a compromise paid-leave proposal that will not harm the economy,” Lord said.

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Massachusetts employers

Employer Confidence Closes 2017 at 18-Year High

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jan 9, 2018 8:51:27 AM

Surging optimism about the state and national economies left Massachusetts employers with their highest level of confidence in 18 years as 2017 drew to a close.

BCI.December.2017.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose one point to 63.6 during December, its highest level since November 2000. The BCI gained 3.2 points during a year in which employer confidence levels remained comfortably within the optimistic range.

Every element of the overall index increased during 2017 except for the Employment Index, which dropped half a point. Analysts believe low unemployment and demographic shifts are impeding the ability of employers to find the workers they need.

“Massachusetts employers maintained a uniformly positive outlook throughout 2017 and passage of the federal tax bill only added to that optimism,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“At the same time, the 12-month decline in the Employment Index reminds us that the persistent shortage of skilled workers has reached an inflection point for the Massachusetts economy. Massachusetts companies have postponed expansions, declined to bid for contracts or outsourced work because they simply can’t find people.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index were mostly higher during December.

The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, surged 2.4 points to 67.6, leaving it 5.8 points better than a year earlier.

The U.S. Index of national business conditions continued a yearlong rally by gaining 2 points to 64.2. December marked the 94th consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, decreased 0.7 points to 62.7 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, rose 2.7 points to 64.5. The Current Index gained 3.6 points and the Future Index 2.8 points during 2017.

Operational Views

The Company Index, reflecting employer views of their own operations and prospects, declined 0.2 points to 62.1.

The Employment Index rose slightly to 56.7, but still ended the year 0.5 points below the 57.2 posted in December 2016.

Manufacturing companies (64.3) continued to be more optimistic than non-manufacturers (62.6). Another unusual result was that employers in western Massachusetts (64.6) posted higher confidence readings than those in the eastern portion of the commonwealth (62.7).

“Employer attitudes largely reflect a national economy that grew at its fastest pace in three years during the third quarter on the strength of business spending on equipment. The headline is that unemployment is down and the financial markets are up,” said Michael A. Tyler, CFA, Chief Investment Officer, Eastern Bank Wealth Management, and a BEA member.

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also BEA member, said employers received an early Christmas present from a federal tax bill that reduced corporate rates from 35 percent to 21 percent and reduced rates for pass-through entities such as subchapter S corporations as well.

“The tax bill produced short-term benefits, ranging from companies like Comcast and Citizens Financial providing bonuses to employees to the utility Eversource reducing electric rates in Massachusetts,” Lord said.

“At the same time, employers are cautious about the effect that other provisions – including limitations on the deduction for state and local taxes – will have on the overall Massachusetts economy.”

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Massachusetts employers

Tax Reform to Reduce Electric Rates

Posted by Bob Rio on Jan 3, 2018 6:22:15 PM

Federal tax reform may soon generate a $56 million windfall for Eversource electric ratepayers in Massachusetts.

Electriclinessmall.jpgEversource disclosed in a filing with the Department of Public Utilities today that the reduction in federal corporate tax rates from 35 percent to 21 percent will allow the company to reverse the rate increase approved for NSTAR customers in November and to reduce the amount of increase for customers of Western Massachusetts Electric Company.

NSTAR customers will now see a $35.4 million decrease in base rates instead of a $12.2 million increase. Western Massachusetts Electric customers will see their rate increase shrink from $24.8 million to $16.5 million.

Eversource indicated that it may seek additional rate reductions next January after calculating excess deferred taxes.

“Great news for Massachusetts employers struggling to manage the high cost of electricity,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs for Associated Industries of Massachusetts.

“Tax reform created a tremendous opportunity to provide rate relief to customers and Eversource deserves credit for moving rapidly to realize that opportunity."

Attorney General Maura Healey filed a motion with the DPU on December 20 seeking larger rate reductions. Eversource says its agrees with the need to reduce rates, but calculates the numbers differently. Utility regulators will now determine the final figures to be implemented on February 1.

AIM urges the DPU to approve the rate reductions for Eversource and to review the rates of other utilities in the wake of the changes in federal tax law.

Topics: Massachusetts employers, Energy, Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities

Summing Up, Looking Ahead: Challenges Await Employers

Posted by Rick Lord on Jan 2, 2018 8:30:00 AM

The first half of the 2017-2018 legislative session in Massachusetts was dominated by the issue of health-care costs and the role employers should play in helping to close a budget gap in the state Medicaid program.

Exterior.jpgBut larger battles await during 2018 as progressive activists seek to place three questions on the Massachusetts election ballot that would together impede economic growth for a generation. The initiatives would impose an 80 percent surtax on incomes more than $1 million for pass-through businesses, establish a $1.3 billion-per-year paid leave program and increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts worked successfully during 2017 on a range of issues confronting its member employers from every sector of the economy.

The most important achievement was a compromise that transformed a proposed $700 million annual health-care surtax into a two-year, $200 million assessment to close the budget shortfall in the commonwealth’s health-insurance program for low-income people. The assessment increased the Employer Medical Assistance Contribution (EMAC) in a manner that will fall most heavily on companies where employees use MassHealth instead of an employer health plan.

The levy will be partially offset by a two-year Unemployment Insurance rate adjustment that will save employers $335 million over two years versus current rates. AIM was disappointed that lawmakers passed the assessment without making structural reforms to the MassHealth program.

“We believe, however, that the Legislature is committed to resolving the financial problems at MassHealth and employers look forward to working with lawmakers toward that goal in 2018,” said John Regan, Executive Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

AIM also played a key role in hammering out compromise legislation to extend employment protection to pregnant workers in Massachusetts.

The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act requires employers to make reasonable workplace accommodations for pregnant employees — more frequent or longer breaks, temporary transfer to a less strenuous or hazardous position, a modified work schedule, or seating for those whose jobs require extended standing.  AIM opposed early versions of the bill because of concern among employers that the legislation provided an applicant or employee with unlimited power to reject multiple and reasonable offers of accommodation by an employer. The compromise bill addresses that concern.

There was no such compromise in August when the Baker Administration introduced regulations that set specific limits on sources of greenhouse gases, the emissions linked to climate change. State officials indicate that the regulations could increase costs to electric ratepayers by as much as 2 percent. The new rules aim to reduce the state’s carbon emissions 25 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, as required by state law.

The regulations, however, were ultimately unnecessary. The administration could have chosen to work with the Legislature to change the Global Warming Solutions Act to allow alternative ways for the electricity sector to meet these obligations.  The administration instead turned a blind eye to the corrosive impacts that high electric rates are having on struggling Massachusetts companies.

The three potential 2018 ballot questions would represent an unprecedented potential policy crisis for Massachusetts:

  • The constitutional tax amendment would raise from 5.1 percent to 9.1 percent the levy on income of more than $1 million per year, including income generated by subchapter S-corporations, LLPs, LLCs, partnerships, and other pass-through entities. The $1.9 billion tax increase would be paid by roughly 19,500 filers, 80 percent of whom are anticipated to file with some business income.
  • The paid leave question would mandate 16 weeks of paid family leave and 26 weeks of paid medical leave for employees for a total projected cost of $1.3 billion.
  • The minimum wage question would raise the wage from the current $11 per hour in annual $1 per-hour annual increments starting in 2019 until it reaches $15 an hour in 2022. That amounts to a projected increase of 36 percent.

Supporters of the paid-leave and minimum wage questions filed the requisite number of signatures last month to move a step closer to the ballot. Massachusetts lawmakers now have until the end of April to consider and pass the initiatives. Any initiatives that are not adopted must gather and file an additional 10,792 signatures by July 3 to make the 2018 ballot.

The income surtax constitutional amendment qualified for the ballot in 2016. In October, I joined four other prominent business leaders in filing a suit challenging the validity of the proposal, asserting that the amendment is riddled with constitutional flaws and would make the new tax essentially permanent and unchangeable. 

“It is impossible to overstate the potential threat that these three ballot questions pose for Massachusetts employers.  The advocates supporting the questions are well funded and are prepared to spend millions of dollars to get their message across to voters,” Regan said.

The ballot battle will take place just as employers begin to comply with the new Massachusetts Pay Equity Law on July 1, 2018. The law prohibits employers from discriminating based on gender in the payment of wages and other compensation for “comparable” work. Many employers are already undertaking the internal wage studies that provide a safe harbor from litigation under the statute.

Beacon Hill lawmakers will conclude the second year of their two-year session on July 31. The end of formal sessions will kick off an election season that will see Governor Charlie Baker, US Senator Elizabeth Warren and other prominent office holders face re-election challenges.

 

Topics: Massachusetts Legislature, Massachusetts employers, Charlie Baker

Would You Buy Your Own Business?

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Nov 30, 2017 8:30:00 AM

Editor’s Note – The following article was written by Rudi Scheiber-Kurtz, CEO of Next Stage Solutions in Burlington, and Gregory R. Rush, Partner & Co-Founder of Dunn Rush & Co. of Boston. They will lead a webinar for AIM and the Exit Planning Exchange New England called “Would You Buy Your Business?” on Wednesday, Dec 6 at noon.

Would you buy your business?

Two_Women.jpgA provocative question indeed, knowing that most business owners will not be able to sell their companies when they’re ready.

It’s discouraging when a business owner realizes that she or he will not get the multiple needed to create a comfortable retirement. According to a recent Forbes article “many owners probably won’t be able to sell their businesses when they’re ready, because they are not taking the critical steps.”

How do you fare in building value for your business, whether in growth mode or ready to sell in the next few years?  Have you done a benchmark assessment to understand where you stand today? What strategic plans have your drawn up for the next three years to achieve sustainable growth?

The December 6 webinar will allow us to take you through the “why” and “how” of building value for your business.  The first part will review benchmarks from a buyers’ perspective and why it is important to focus on these pieces.   The second part will give the “how” tools with seven modules so you can systematically create value over time.

The stakes could not be higher: Getting your business into a scaling and growth mode and increasing the valuation of your business will determine whether you can fund your retirement.

Sometimes you can’t see the forest for the trees.  Understanding what a buyer thinks of your business will help you to improve the way in which you address market demands.  Taking you out of working in the business to working on the business will transition you from manager to leader, an important next stage for your business.

Yogi Berra’s famous quote “When you get to the fork in the road, take it” is a great thought, however, if you get to the fork and get stuck, you may not have any option about which road to take.

This webinar will be a first step to understanding the perspective of a buyer and what you need to focus on over the next few years.

Associated Industries of Massachusetts is presenting the webinar because many of the association’s 4,000 member employers are small or family-owned companies that struggle with transition strategies.

“Sure, AIM counts plenty of internationally recognized corporations as members, but the association has always had a core membership of small to medium-sized employers who often never have the opportunity to see their businesses the way a potential buyer does,” said AIM President and Chief Executive Officer Richard C. Lord.

The one-hour webinar will provide plenty of time for your questions. 

Register for the Webinar

 

Topics: Massachusetts employers, Management

Business Confidence Hits Another High for 2017

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Nov 7, 2017 8:27:44 AM

Employer confidence in Massachusetts hit another high for 2017 during October as economic growth accelerated and companies remained optimistic about the national outlook.

BCI.October.2017.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) edged up 0.3 points to 62.7, leaving it 6.5 points better than in October 2016. The uptick was driven by a brightening view of employment growth and firming confidence among manufacturers.

The reading came as MassBenchmarks reported that the Massachusetts economy grew at 5.9 percent during the third quarter, almost double the rate of the national economy. Payroll employment grew at a 2.1 percent annual rate in Massachusetts in the third quarter as compared to 1.2 percent nationally.

“The acceleration of the Massachusetts economy in the third quarter provided additional fuel to an already solid sense of confidence among employers as we head for 2018,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“At the same time, optimism about the national economy suggests that employers believe growth rates throughout the US will increase even more if Congress follows through on its proposal to lower the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 20 percent.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index pointed mostly higher during October.

The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, slipped 0.3 points to 65.1, still 4.1 points more than a year earlier. October marked the 91st consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The U.S. Index of national business conditions rose 2.7 points to 62.5, continuing a 13.3-point surge for the 12-month period. 

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, increased 0.7 points to 63.6 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, remained even at 61.9 points. The Current Index has risen 7.6 points and the Future Index 5.6 points during the past year.

Operational Views

The Company Index, reflecting overall business conditions, lost 0.3 points to 62.0. There was better news in the Employment Index, a key predictor of economic health, which rose 2.0 points to 57.8.

“The Massachusetts economy continues to grow at a robust pace and to add jobs in a broad array of sectors despite tightening regional labor markets. With the statewide unemployment rate now below four percent, it is not clear the commonwealth’s economic expansion is sustainable at its current pace,” noted Professor Michael D. Goodman, Executive Director of the Public Policy Center (PPC) at UMass Dartmouth and a BEA member.
Massachusetts Concerns

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, a BEA member, said employer optimism continues to be tempered by the prospect of three potentially destructive ballot questions appearing on the 2018 state election ballot.

“Massachusetts employers face an unprecedented public-policy crisis as activists seek to place three questions on the 2018 Massachusetts election ballot that would together impede economic growth for a generation: a surtax on incomes of more than $1 million, an expansive and bureaucratic paid family leave program and an increase in the minimum wage,” Lord said.

“Having just honored 16 Massachusetts employers for creating jobs and economic opportunity for the people of Massachusetts, AIM remains concerned about ballot questions that are clearly intended to be punitive toward employers.”

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Massachusetts employers

Employers Renew Commitment to Pay Equity

Posted by Joanne Hilferty on Oct 20, 2017 8:30:00 AM

Editor's Note - Joanne Hilferty is President and Chief Executive Officer of Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries in Boston and a member of the AIM Board of Directors.

Massachusetts employers say they are committed to accelerating the modest progress they have made to close the gender pay gap.

Fourpeople.jpgScores of business leaders shared challenges and success stories recently at the third annual Boston Women’s Workforce Council (BWWC) Best Practices Conference at the Colonnade Hotel in Boston. Associated Industries of Massachusetts is a signatory to the Boston 100 Percent Talent Compact developed by the Council, Boston University and the City of Boston to ensure that men and women enjoy equal compensation opportunities in the work force.

Several prominent members of AIM have also signed the document, including Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Boston Children’s Hospital, Eastern Bank, Eversource, Harvard Pilgrim, MassMutual, MORE Advertising, National Grid, Putnam Investments, Staples and State Street Corporation. I am proud to say that the organization I lead, Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries, is also a signatory.

Companies that sign the compact commit to reviewing their compensation practices to ensure fairness. These companies provide compensation data anonymously to researchers at Boston University who use it to develop a broad assessment of wage equality in Massachusetts. 

“AIM signed the Compact because Massachusetts employers operate in a competitive, talent-driven economy in which companies that reward skilled workers equally will come out on top,” said Rick Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIM.

“Wage equity will ultimately be driven by the marketplace, which is desperately short of the employees needed to drive economic growth in the next decade.”

The 2017 Best Practices Conference drew more than 220 participants.

Business leaders noted that companies looking at signing the compact have expressed concern about the need to guarantee the confidentiality of any compensation data they provide to the project. Council executives say they can guarantee confidentiality but need to better communicate that point to employers.

The conference also provided an opportunity for the BWWC’s Co-Chairs, Cathy Minehan and Evelyn Murphy, to share the highlights from the 2017 data analysis, the full results of which will be published in the organization’s 2017 report, out later this year.  The key takeaway was that there has been some progress – albeit limited – in addressing the wage gap.

Governor Charlie Baker last year signed a compromise pay-equity law that is intended to promote salary transparency while recognizing legitimate market forces such as performance and the competitive landscape for certain skills that cause pay differences among employees.  AIM supported the compromise.

Topics: Employment Law, Massachusetts employers, wage equity

Employer Confidence Rebounds

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Oct 3, 2017 9:05:54 AM

Massachusetts employers are as optimistic as they have been all year about the overall economy and prospects for their own businesses.

BCI.September.2017.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) broke a two-month slide in September, rising 1.2 points to 62.4. The reading equaled its high for 2017 and was 6.5 points better than a year ago.

Employer confidence has moved in a narrow range so far in 2017 as employers appear bullish about the growth prospects of their companies. The September uptick was driven in part by a 5.7-point surge in the sales index, which is often a leading indicator of increased business activity.

“The Index was also taken prior to the announcement of an effort by Congressional Republicans and the White House to significantly reduce corporate taxes, a move that enjoys broad support among employers,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“The prospect of tax reform and tax simplification is likely to buoy employer sentiment through the end of the year.”

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index were generally higher during September.

The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, rose 2.2 points to 65.4, a reading that was 8.4 points higher than in September 2016.

The U.S. Index of national business conditions dropped 0.4 points to 59.8 after surging more than 10 points during the previous 12 months. September marked the 90th consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, increased 1.6 points to 62.9 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, rose 0.7 points to 61.29 The Future Index ended the month 5.9 points higher than a year ago.

The Company Index, reflecting overall business conditions, gained 1.4 points to 62.3. The employment Index fell 2.2 points to 55.8, continuing an up-and-down pattern within the mid-50s on the 100-point scale.

“The Massachusetts economy continues to maintain a steady recovery, with employers adding 10,800 jobs during August and the state jobless rate declining to 4.2 percent,” said Elmore Alexander, Dean, Ricciardi College of Business, Bridgewater State University, and a BEA member.

“The surge in the AIM Sales and Future indices suggests that business activity may actually accelerate in coming months, so the primary challenge for employers will remain hiring and retaining skilled workers in a tight labor market.”

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, a BEA member, said employers generally support federal initiatives to reduce business taxes, but also remain concerned about the potential effect those reductions might have on the federal deficit.

It is ironic, Lord said, that the proposed Republican tax plan would lower levies for subchapter S corporations and other small pass-through businesses, while Massachusetts voters may be voting on a surtax next year on those same companies.

“Subchapter s corporations and other companies that pay taxes on the individual level are generally small to medium-sized enterprises that form the heart of the Massachusetts economy. What a shame it would be if the federal government were to help these companies while Massachusetts penalizes them,” he said.

Topics: AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy, Massachusetts employers

AbbVie - Employer Remains Determined to Make a Difference

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Oct 2, 2017 3:25:52 PM

Editor's note: The global pharmaceutical company AbbVie will receive a 2017 AIM Next Century Award on Thursday at the association's annual employer celebration from 4:30-6:30 at Mechanics Hall in Worcester. AbbVie's 450,000-square-foot Worcester facility employs approximately 900 employees who primarily focus on immunology drug research, protein engineering, and small-batch manufacturing of biotech drugs for clinical trials.

 

Register for the Worcester Celebration

Topics: Massachusetts employers, Technology, AIM Next Century Award

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