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Video Blog | Economic Outlook 2019

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Feb 1, 2019 9:11:06 AM

The AIM Economic Outlook Forum on January 25 looked at creative solutions to the persistent shortage of skilled workers in Massachusetts. Watch as WBZ radio morning news anchor Jeff Brown moderates a discussion with Robin LeClaire, President of Lampin Corporation in Uxbridge; Massachusetts Secretary of Labor and Workforce Development Rosalin Acosta and UMass Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy.

Topics: Skills Gap, Massachusetts economy, AIM Executive Forum

Many Job Openings, Few Job Seekers

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jan 25, 2019 11:41:10 AM

At a time when there are more job openings than job seekers in New England and throughout the United States, Massachusetts must summon all its creativity and innovation to solve the structural shortage of qualified workers, AIM President Rick Lord and a group of experts said today.

SOMB2019“There are 6.9 million job openings throughout the United States this morning. There are 6.2 million unemployed people throughout the United States looking for work. Closer to home, there are 51,000 more jobs available in the six New England states than people to fill them,” Lord told an audience of 300 employers during his final State of Massachusetts Business Address.

“The good news is that we live in a commonwealth known for creative solutions to seemingly intractable problems. A state that has produced everything from the game of basketball to the microwave oven to Facebook should certainly be a leader in ensuring that all its citizens share in the economic possibilities that lie ahead.”

Lord offered several recommendations to help Massachusetts employers find the people they need to fuel economic growth:

  • Overhauling the work-force development system to ensure that people of all ages are being taught the skills that employers demand.
  • Ensuring that the public schools provide the basic skills that allow students to compete for jobs that were not even envisioned 20 years ago.
  • Supporting and expanding vocational education.
  • Resolving the immigration issue that has restricted the availability of skilled foreign workers in Massachusetts and other education and technology driven economies.
  • Expanding opportunity to the full diversity of the Massachusetts population. Lord noted that the unemployment rate among people of color exceeds 6 percent in Massachusetts and among Latinos is 5.6 percent.
  • Encouraging collaboration among employers, schools, community colleges, universities and training providers to establish a consistent and logical path from learning to employment.

Lord highlighted several examples of such collaborations, including an initiative by Prime Motor Group to provide scholarships and employment opportunities to automotive technology students at the Benjamin Franklin School of Technology in Boston.

Robin LeClaire, President of Lampin Corporation in Uxbridge, said the 35-person manufacturing company is working on multiple fronts to attract and train people to replace a workforce heavily tilted toward 40 and 50-somethings. The company speaks frequently to middle- and high-school students to let them know that manufacturing offers a rewarding career path to young people who don’t wish to attend college or who cannot afford to do so in the traditional manner.

“They don’t know that there are jobs other than those that require going to college,” said LeClaire.

“We tell them that when they come to Lampin, we’ll pay for them to go to college.”

Massachusetts Secretary of Labor and Work Force Development Rosalin Acosta said it is “astonishing” that the state economy added 185,000 people during 2018 amid a 3.4 percent unemployment rate. She warned, however, that the future work force – people 19 years of age or under – has virtually flattened.

“Where are we going to get all the people employers need, and how are we going to get the right people with the right skills,” Acosta said.

She told the audience that the Baker Administration is focusing its job-training resources on three key areas - manufacturing, health care and information technology.

University of Massachusetts Amherst Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy said the commonwealth’s formidable lineup of colleges and universities are using internships and other experiential learning to ensure that students have the ability to meet the evolving needs of employers.

“Employers now look for employees who are more job ready that when we went to college,” Subbaswamy said.

Topics: Skills Gap, AIM Executive Forum, Workforce Training

Health Insurance Costs Top Employer Concerns Heading into 2019

Posted by John Regan on Nov 29, 2018 8:00:00 AM

The rising cost of providing health insurance to employees remains the most pressing issue facing Massachusetts employers, a new AIM survey shows.

health_careThree-quarters of the employers who participated in the association’s biennial Issues Survey from September to November identified the cost of health care as one of their three policy priorities. Other major challenges include work-force availability (64 percent), regulatory issues (53 percent) and the new paid family and medical leave law (51 percent).

AIM conducts the survey to solicit employer opinions on its policy agenda for the upcoming two-year session of the Massachusetts Legislature.

“AIM members understand the value of providing good health insurance to their employees, but employers are telling us clearly that they need relief from the relentless cost increases generated by the health-care system,” said Katie Holahan, Vice President of Government Affairs at AIM.

“AIM looks forward to addressing the health-cost issue on multiple fronts, from working with industry partners on health-plan design to resolving the employer MassHealth assessment to leading an employer effort to reduce unnecessary use of emergency rooms.”

One hundred sixty-eight employers participated in the AIM survey. The top 10 issues were:

  1. The cost of health care – 74 percent
  2. The availability of work force – 64 percent
  3. Regulatory issues (including compliance) – 53 percent
  4. Paid family and medical leave – 50 percent
  5. State and local taxes – 42 percent
  6. Minimum wage & the cost of electricity (tie) – 28 percent
  7. Transportation & federal taxes (tie) – 21 percent
  8. Trade issues – 15 percent
  9. Education – 12 percent
  10. Housing – 2 percent

Several employers expressed concern about the cumulative burden of government-imposed expenses – including the $200 million MassHealth assessment, unemployment insurance and minimum-wage increases – on their ability to grow and create jobs.

Health-insurance costs have been a dominant worry for Massachusetts employers for decades.

The Massachusetts Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) reported in September that health care-spending in the commonwealth grew 1.6 percent from 2016 to 2017, with costs totaling $61.1 billion, or about $8,900 per resident.

While 2017 was the second consecutive year that overall growth came in below the 3.6 percent benchmark set by the Health Policy Commission, small-business premiums rose on average 6.9 percent. Deductibles, co-pays, co-insurance and other out-of-pocket expenses were up 5.7 percent.

Contact John Regan at jregan@aimnet.org

Topics: Skills Gap, Health Care Costs, Health Care

Employer Confidence Surges during May

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Jun 5, 2018 9:28:26 AM

Business confidence surged during May to its highest level since the summer of 2000, driven by improving employer outlooks about the state and national economies.

BCI.May.2018The Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose 2.4 points to 66.6 last month after increasing modestly during April. The BCI has risen in five of the last six months and now stands 5.8 points higher than its level of a year ago.

Confidence remains well within the optimistic range. The only whiff of concern came in the index that measures hiring, which dropped 1.5 points for the month and 0.2 points during the year.

Economists believe the weakness in the AIM Employment Index reflects the persistent shortage of workers in Massachusetts that has forced some employers to postpone expansions or to decline new business opportunities.

Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design, cautioned that major month-to-month movements in the Index like those in May sometimes reflect statistical or sampling anomalies. He noted, however, that the numbers are consistent with a general sense that the US and state economies are picking up steam in the second quarter after a slow start to 2018.

“There are signs GDP growth gathered momentum early in the second quarter, with solid consumer spending, business investment on equipment and industrial production,” Torto said.

The nation’s economy grew at a 2.2 percent rate during the first quarter. Hiring across the US remains strong, with the government reporting on Friday that employers added 223,000 jobs during May.

“And the Massachusetts economy continues to operate at virtually full capacity, creating significant constraints on the availability of labor,” said Torto.

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index were largely higher in May.
The Massachusetts Index assessing business conditions within the commonwealth surged 5.9 points to 70.0, leaving it 7.9 points higher than in May 2017.

The U.S. Index ended the month at 69.3, up 5.4 points for the month and 14.4 points for the year.
May marked the 99th consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, gained 1.5 points to 66.6. The Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, increased 3.3 points to the same 66.6 level. The Current Index has risen 6.2 points and the Future Index 5.3 points since May 2017.

Employer views of their own companies were mixed.

The Company Index increased slightly to 64.5, up 2.1 points for 12 months. The Employment Index ended the month at 58.3, a 1.5-point decrease for the month and 0.2 points lower than a year ago. The Sales Index rose 1.7 points for the month and 3.3 points for the year.

Manufacturing companies (66.8) and non-manufacturers (66.3) were equally optimistic about the economy. Companies in the eastern part of Massachusetts (67.9) were more bullish than those in the west (64.6).

“Massachusetts employers remain confident, but economic growth in the commonwealth is increasingly bumping up against the structural shortage of skilled workers,” said Alan Clayton-Matthews, a BEA member and professor in the School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs, Northeastern University.

Clayton-Matthews told MassBenchmarks earlier this year: “Retiring baby boomers will continue to dampen labor force growth this year and throughout the next decade unless the commonwealth is able to attract young workers from across the country and the world.”

The BCI increase came as the Mass Insight index of consumer confidence in Massachusetts suffered its biggest quarterly decline in years, from 134 in February to 121 in May. The index remined in optimistic territory, but fell below a comparable index for national consumer confidence for the first time since 2014.

Mixed Signals

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also BEA member, said the increase in business confidence underscores the underlying strength of the economy at a time when employers are receiving mixed signals from government.

“On the one hand, employers are seeing benefits from federal tax reform. On the other hand, they are struggling to process the new Massachusetts health-care surcharge and looking ahead warily to the possibility that Massachusetts voters may approve a graduated income tax that could harm small businesses,” Lord said.

“AIM and the employer community are seeking to negotiate reasonable compromises on issues such as paid family/medical leave and a $15 per hour minimum wage, compromises that would allow employers to continue creating jobs for Massachusetts residents.”

Topics: Skills Gap, AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy

Looking for Employees? Evacuees from Puerto Rico are Looking for Work

Posted by John Regan on May 3, 2018 8:30:00 AM

AIM is working with the Baker Administration to assist the thousands of people who fled hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico to live in Massachusetts - people who are ready to go to work for Bay State employers who have struggled to find workers in a full-employment economy.

HurricaneMariaMore than 140 people who left Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria destroyed the island in September have already been hired by Massachusetts companies, including several AIM members. Many of the evacuees have work experience in office and administration, sales and related fields, food preparation and serving, transportation and moving materials, education/library, landscaping, production, management, and health-care related occupations.

The largest group of evacuees is found in Springfield, Holyoke and rest of Hampden County. Other significant populations have settled in Great New Bedford, central Massachusetts and the Merrimack Valley.

The state’s network of one-stop career centers is coordinating efforts to secure employment and housing for people relocated from Puerto Rico. The career centers are also working with the evacuees on issues such as work readiness, English-language skills and conversion of specific licenses for professional occupations such as nursing, social work and cosmetology.

The list of AIM-member employers who have already hired Puerto Rican evacuees include DeMoulas Market Basket, MassMutual, Packaging Corporation of America, Staples and Walmart.

Category 4 Hurricane Maria caused an estimated $94 billion in damage when it struck Puerto Rico on September 20. The storm left more than one million people without power and prompted more than 250,000 island residents to relocate to the continental United States.

Employers interested in hiring evacuees may contact Massachusetts Undersecretary for Workforce Development, Jennifer James, at 617.626.7124.

Topics: Skills Gap, Associated Industries of Massachusetts, Massachusetts economy

Employer Confidence Strengthens, Despite Market Volatility

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Mar 6, 2018 7:40:45 AM

Massachusetts employer confidence strengthened during February as optimism about long-term economic growth outweighed a volatile month in the financial markets.

BCI.February.2018.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) rose 0.4 points to 64.5, setting another 17-year high. The BCI has gained 2.4 points during the past 12 months as confidence levels have remained comfortably within the optimistic range.

Enthusiasm about the U.S. and Massachusetts economies, along with a bullish outlook on the part of manufacturers, fueled the February increase.

At the same time, hiring remained a red flag as the BCI Employment Index fell 4 points between February 2017 and February 2018. Almost 90 percent of employers who responded to the February confidence survey indicated that the inability to find skilled employees is either a modest, large or huge problem.

“Fourteen percent of respondents said finding employees represents a huge problem that is hampering their company’s growth. One-third of employers see employee recruitment as a big problem, while 29 percent see it as a modest issue,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“For the short-term, however, the state and national economies remain strong and the recent announcement by Amazon of a major expansion in Boston indicates that the trend should continue.”

The survey was taken before President Donald Trump roiled the financial markets last week by pledging to impose stiff tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index were mixed during February.

The most significant gains came in the Manufacturing Index, which surged 3.9 points to 66.2, and the US Index, which rose 2.1 points for the month to 66.9 and 8.0 points for the year. The Massachusetts Index fell 0.4 points to 68.5, but was up 5.3 points for the year and still higher than the national outlook for the 96th consecutive month.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, rose 2.4 points to 64.1.

The Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, declined 1.6 points to 65. The Current Index has risen 4.2 points and the Future Index 0.6 points during the past 12 months.
Operational Views

The Company Index, reflecting employer views of their own operations and prospects, was essentially flat, gaining 0.1 points to 62.4. The Employment Index also rose 0.1 points, to 56.4, versus 60.4 in February 2017.

Manufacturing companies (66.2) were more optimistic than non-manufacturers (61.9). Large employers (69.8) were more bullish than medium-sized (62.0) or small businesses (62.7).

“The special February BCI question about the ability of employers to find and hire skilled employees confirms our concerns about the long-term changes now facing the Massachusetts labor market,” said Alan Clayton-Matthews, Ph.D., School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs, Northeastern University, and a BEA member.

“Since the end of the Great Recession, total employment has grown by 355,600, the working age population has increased by 326,700, and the labor force has grown by 208,100. In other words, employment in Massachusetts has grown considerably faster than the working age population, and almost twice as fast as the labor force.” 

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also BEA member, said member employers expressed broad optimism about the national economy in the wake of tax reform, but remain uncertain about Massachusetts given the prospect of ballot questions that would impose an income tax surcharge, mandate paid family leave and increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour.

“Massachusetts employers have been more bullish about the state economy than the national economy for 96 consecutive months, but the numbers are now very close – 68.5 for Massachusetts and 66.9 for the nation,” Lord said.

“Economic competitiveness is a constant struggle. AIM looks forward to working with the Legislature and Governor Baker during the next several months to ensure that Massachusetts companies are able to grow and prosper here.”

Topics: Skills Gap, AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy

A Positive First Step for Manufacturing Education

Posted by Katie Holahan on Dec 18, 2017 8:30:00 AM

The Baker Administration last week took a first step toward addressing the shortage of skilled workers in Massachusetts by unveiling a program that allows residents interested in advanced manufacturing careers to take classes at local vocation schools.

manufacturing.jpgThe Advanced Manufacturing Certificate Program will train adults at 10 Massachusetts vocational schools during the evenings and on week-ends, when equipment would typically not be in use.

Adults who complete the manufacturing training will be eligible for college credit when enrolling at partnering colleges and universities. The certificate they earn during evening classes at the high schools will be worth a specific number of college credits that can be applied toward an associates’ degree.

A planning team, made up of vocational school, public and private higher education officials and workforce and industry partners, will work on curriculum, align credential agreements, and develop internships and hiring opportunities.

“The program provides another opportunity for students to pursue an affordable education in advanced manufacturing to learn a skill set and find a good paying job in this growing industry,” said Governor Baker. “This unique program leverages state and federal resources and offers much needed flexibility to give people better career options and a path toward a college degree.”

Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Industries of Massachusetts, said the initiative address one of the most pressing impediments to growth faced by employers.

“The AIM Blueprint for the Next Century economic growth plan identifies the shortage of skilled workers as a real issue across manufacturing and many other industries. The Advanced Manufacturing Certificate Program will give people valuable skills using resources that already exist,” Lord said.

Participating schools include:

  • Assabet Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School in Marlborough
  • Bristol-Plymouth Regional Technical High School in Taunton
  • Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School in Fall River
  • Essex Agricultural and Technical High School in Danvers
  • Greater Lawrence Technical High School in Andover
  • Greater New Bedford Regional Vocational Technical High School in New Bedford
  • Minuteman Regional Technical Vocational High School in Lexington
  • Nashoba Valley Technical High School in Westford
  • Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical High School in Easton
  • Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School in Haverhill

Students will enroll in vocational classes in September, with expected enrollment in the first year to be between 200 to 300 students. 

While the first year of the program will be focused on advanced manufacturing, state and local education officials plan to eventually expand the strategy into other fields, such as HVAC, auto technicians, and electrical professions. 

Topics: Skills Gap, Manufacturing, Massachusetts Manufacturing

Employer Confidence Flat; Labor Shortage Remains a Concern

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Dec 5, 2017 9:20:02 AM

Employer confidence in Massachusetts remained essentially unchanged during November as companies apparently began to bump up against a persistent shortage of qualified workers.

BCI.November.2017.jpgThe Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index (BCI) lost 0.1 points off its 2017 high to 62.6, still 4.5 points better than in November 2016. The slight decline reflected a drop in confidence among non-manufacturing companies and a year-over-year decline in the index that measures employer hiring plans.

Analysts on the AIM Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) believe that Massachusetts may be suffering from too much of a good thing – a 3.7 percent unemployment rate that threatens to derail the ability of employers to find the workers they need to grow at a time when large number of baby boomers prepare to leave the work force.

“The concern is that Massachusetts could become a victim of its own success,” said Raymond G. Torto, Chair of AIM's Board of Economic Advisors (BEA) and Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Design.

“Employers feel optimistic about the state economy, the national economy and their own growth prospects, but they worry where the computer programmers, machinists and accountants needed to fuel that growth are going to come from and where they are going to live.”

Wage growth, however, remains muted. The AIM HR Practices Survey released yesterday shows that Massachusetts employers project average wage increases of 2.66 percent for 2018, down from 2.75 percent this year.

The AIM Index, based on a survey of Massachusetts employers, has appeared monthly since July 1991. It is calculated on a 100-point scale, with 50 as neutral; a reading above 50 is positive, while below 50 is negative. The Index reached its historic high of 68.5 on two occasions in 1997-98, and its all-time low of 33.3 in February 2009.

The Index has remained above 50 since October 2013.

Constituent Indicators

The constituent indicators that make up the overall Business Confidence Index were mixed during November.

The Massachusetts Index, assessing business conditions within the commonwealth, gained 0.1 points to 65.2, leaving it 5.4 points better than a year earlier.

The U.S. Index of national business conditions lost 0.3 points to 62.2, pausing after a yearlong rally. October marked the 92nd consecutive month in which employers have been more optimistic about the Massachusetts economy than the national economy.

The Current Index, which assesses overall business conditions at the time of the survey, decreased 0.2 points to 63.4 while the Future Index, measuring expectations for six months out, edged down 0.1 points. The Current Index has risen 6.5 points and the Future Index 2.6 points during the past year.
Operational Views

The Company Index, reflecting overall business conditions, rose 0.3 points to 62.3. The most significant operational result, however, came in the Employment Index, which lost 1.2 points and ended the month 0.8 points below its level of a year ago. Another unusual result was that manufacturing companies were more optimistic than non-manufacturing companies.

“The movement of the overall Business Confidence Index was small as the economy continued to grow and add jobs at a healthy pace. But the weakness in the Employment Index suggests that the expansion may finally be bumping into a pervasive shortage of skilled workers across multiple industries,” said Katherine A. Kiel, Ph.D., Professor of Economics, College of the Holy Cross, and a BEA member.

Political Fireworks

AIM President and CEO Richard C. Lord, also BEA member, said employers remain upbeat despite uncertainty surrounding the federal and state political landscape.

“The tax bill passed last week by the US Senate contains a significant reduction in both corporate rates and rates for pass-through businesses, two provisions that are widely popular among employers. At the same time, employers are concerned about provisions that could become problematic for Massachusetts, including limits on the deductibility of state and local taxes, and loss of the federal research-and-development credit,” Lord said.

“All this is taking place as activists continue to work to place three questions on the 2018 Massachusetts election ballot that would together impede economic growth for a generation: a surtax on incomes of more than $1 million, an expansive and bureaucratic paid family leave program and an increase in the minimum wage.”

Topics: Skills Gap, AIM Business Confidence Index, Massachusetts economy

Morgan Memorial Goodwill Earns 2016 Gould Education and Work Force Award

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Apr 27, 2016 1:02:37 PM

Most people know Goodwill for its retail stores that sell everything from gently used clothing to home furnishings.

Not enough people know that those stores are the face of a sophisticated job-training and placement organization that helps thousands of people of all abilities break into the employment market and contribute to the Massachusetts economy.

Goodwill.jpgThis job training and placement work over many decades has earned Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries of Boston the 2016 John Gould Education and Workforce Development Award from Associated Industries of Massachusetts. The award will be presented before 750 Bay State business leaders at the AIM Annual Meeting May 13 at the Westin Waterfront hotel in Boston.

Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries helps more than 8,200 people prepare for jobs each year – 7,700 people through Boston Career Link, the one-stop career center it operates, and another 560 people through its job training, including the First Step Job Readiness Program and the Human Services Employment Ladder Program. Goodwill’s mission is to help individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to achieve independence and dignity through work.

“Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries plays a central role in matching qualified job candidates with companies across industries such as retail, health care and banking that require large numbers of entry-level employees,” said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of AIM.

“The work done at Goodwill not only provides hard-working people a pathway into the job market, but also meets the need of employers to address the most prevalent challenge they face in a growing economy – finding good employees.”

Goodwill collaborates with hundreds of employers to promote and facilitate the hiring of the individuals it serves. The organization’s business partners include Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Citizens Bank, Northeastern University, Stacy’s Pita Chip Company, and the TJX Companies. Many of those employers participate in on-site recruitment events, industry briefings, and career fairs at Boston Career Link, which connect businesses to qualified job seekers.

The Human Services Employment Ladder Program prepares individuals for entry level positions in the burgeoning human services field. The program’s business advisory council is made up of eleven employers, including Pine Street Inn, Vinfen, and Walnut Street Center.

“Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries and all our partners are honored to be recognized with the 18th annual John Gould award from AIM,” said Joanne Hilferty, who has served as president and chief executive officer since 1995.

“It’s fitting that Goodwill receive this award from a business association, since our collaborations with hundreds of Massachusetts employers brings trained, dedicated employees to the workforce, and helps people move to economic self-sufficiency. The award honors every staff member, partner and participant whose hard work makes all this happen.”

The Gould Award was established in 1998 to recognize the contributions of individuals, employers, and institutions to the quality of public education and the advancement, employability, and productivity of residents of the commonwealth. In 2000, the award was named after John Gould, upon his retirement as President and CEO of AIM, to recognize his work to improve the quality of public education and workforce training activities in Massachusetts.   

Goodwill’s headquarters and the Career Link one-stop center are in Boston. The organization also operates  job training centers in Boston and Salem;  a distribution center in Boston;  and stores in Boston, South Boston, Allston/Brighton, Cambridge, Worcester, Somerville, Quincy, South Attleboro, and Hyannis. The organization employs 375 people.

Register for the 2016 AIM Annual Meeting

Topics: Skills Gap, Education, Workforce Training

Verizon Executive Heads New Workforce Board

Posted by Christopher Geehern on Feb 29, 2016 7:09:32 AM

A Verizon executive who last year co-chaired the Associated Industries of Massachusetts centennial will lead a new state panel charged with improving the Massachusetts work-force development system.

Cupelo.jpgVerizon New England Region President Donna Cupelo will chair the Massachusetts Workforce Development Board, created by Governor Charlie Baker in December to improve the accountability of the state’s One-Stop Career Centers and regional workforce boards. The board will also include three members of the AIM Board of Directors and several representatives of AIM-member employers.

“The Workforce Development Board will allow us to reimagine how we create skill-building programs across the state,” Baker said while swearing in board members last Thursday.

“Our administration is focused on driving economic growth and creating new job opportunities by designing programs that meet the demands of businesses in each region, and give workers the skills they need to fill job openings.”

The primary task of the board will be to ensure that the commonwealth’s far-flung training programs develop the skills demanded by employers.  The board will also recommend strategies to promote workforce participation of women, people of color, veterans, and persons with disabilities across industry sectors.

The Workforce Development Board reconstitutes the former Workforce Investment Board by reducing its membership from 65 to 33 members and ensuring the makeup of the board complies with federal requirements under the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). The board will consist of 17 business representatives and seven work force representatives – including four representatives from community-based organizations and two from labor, one of which is chosen by the National Association of Government Employees (NAGE).

Executive Branch representatives from the Executive Offices of Labor and Workforce Development, Health and Human Services, Housing and Economic Development and Education will also serve in addition to the governor’s designee, two state legislators and two local government representatives.

WIOA was signed into law by the President on July 22, 2014 replacing the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, with the goal to transform the nation’s workforce system and to invest in a skilled workforce.

In addition to Cupelo, AIM members serving on the board include:

  • Joanne Berwald, an AIM director and vice president of human resources at Mestek Inc., a global HVAC manufacturer in Westfield.
  • Anne Broholm, also an AIM director and chief executive officer of AHEAD, LLC, which provides a variety of products to the golf industry.
  • Gerard E. Burke is the president and CEO of Hillcrest Educational Centers Inc., a role he has held since 1992.
  • Susan Mailman is the owner and president of Coghlin Electrical Contractors, Inc., a fourth generation family-owned electrical, telecommunications, and networking business located in Worcester.
  • Joanne M. Pokaski is director of workforce development at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.
  • Elizabeth Williams, an AIM director and president and CEO of Roxbury Technology Corp., a Boston-based company that remanufactures recycled inkjet and laser toner printer cartridges.

"Finding employees with the requisite skills to succeed in the global economy is the dominant concern of Massachusetts employers in 2016. We're delighted that Donna Cupelo will chair the new Workforce Development Board with the able collaboration of so many gifted employers," said Richard C. Lord, President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Industries of Massachusetts.


Topics: Skills Gap, Workforce Training

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